WELCOME to the “Hermon A. MacNeil” — Virtual Gallery & Museum !

~ Welcome to the virtual Gallery that celebrates Hermon Atkins MacNeil, American sculptor of the Beaux Arts School. Over 120 stories and 600 photos create this digital museum / classroom. MacNeil led a generation of American sculptors in capturing many fading Native American images in the realism of this classic style. He also designed and sculpted for World's Fairs, public monuments, coins, and buildings across to country. [ Over 50 hot-links on the lower right columns lead to photos and information about various works by MacNeil. ]
~ At HermonAtkinsMacNeil.com, we celebrate his work 24/7.
~ Each February is "MacNeil Month" to honor his birth on February 27, 1866.

Visit MacNeil’s Monuments & Sculptures All Around Us!

Enjoy works of H.A. MacNeil here, at home, on vacation, wherever...
-- Use CATEGORY list below (Location, Expos, World Fairs ...)
-- Google Maps show location of sculptures!
-- Click on "Public Sculptures of H.A.MacNeil" to see photos.
-- Study & Leave COMMENTS at the bottom of any Posting.

Archive for MacNeil PostCard

Christmas Greetings from the home of Hermon and Carol MacNeil. 

Pictured below is a tinted postcard of their studio which ajoined their home on College Point.  Beneath that you can see their actual 1922 Christmas card drawn by Hermon MacNeil for their friends.  Married on Christmas Day in 1895, this is also Hermon and Carol’s 27th Wedding Anniversary.  (CLICK for MORE)
Note how Hermon’s Christmas card sketch resembles his “Sun Vow” pair of Native Americans from a quarter century earlier. 

MERRY CHRISTMAS

from the MacNeil’s of College Point just 91 years ago.

MacNeil studio in College Point

MacNeil studio in College Point

MacNeil Christmas card

MacNeil Christmas card 1922 (photo courtesy of  – James Haas)

 ONE COUNTRY,   ONE CONSTITUTION,   ONE DESTINY

words from the Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Monument in Philadelphia

“IN GIVING FREEDOM TO THE SLAVE

WE ASSURE FREEDOM TO THE FREE”.  Abraham Lincoln

CLICK HERE for interpretive video

Early postcard (about 1927) shows the back of MacNeil's "Soldiers and Sailors" Monument looking east to the downtown. (Photo credit Gib Shell, KC,MO)

The Soldiers and Sailors Monument in Philadelphia By Hermon A. MacNeil was dedicated in 1927. Two 60 foot granite pylons mark the entrance to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The period automobiles and newly planted trees line the Parkway. This beautiful boulevard leads from Logan Circle through the rolling Parkway Gardens on up the hill to the Philadelphia Art Museums.

Hermon A. MacNeil's “Soldiers and Sailors Monuments” mark the entrance to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphia

Link

 

February is “MacNeil Month at HermonAtkinsMacNeil.com

Feb 27th, 2012 is the 146th Anniversary of Hermon MacNeil’s birth.

Hermon MacNeil’s “Coming of the White Man” sculpture in Portland, OR, appears to be the most popular postcard of all his statues.

"Coming of the White Man" (Postcard credit: Gibson Shell, KC MO)

Hermon A. MacNeil’s “Coming of the White Man” in Portland Oregon has an interesting story of the  boulder-like stone that forms its base.  This postcard image from Gib Shell shows the enormous granite stone on which MacNeil placed the statue.

The story, as I read it from a newspaper interview from about 1905, went like this.  MacNeil was very particular about how his sculptures were mounted. Many of them were placed on bases that he made as a special part of the piece.  The Marquette-Jolliet-Illini grouping in Chicago, the “Confederate Defenders” statue in Charleston each have stone bases with carvings, words, and art details that compliment the piece.

MacNeil wanted a stone base that fit into the wooded setting of Washington Park (Plaza Park) in Portland,Oregon.  The site for the statue, I am told, overlooks the Columbia River to the East.  The Native American pair [a Chief of the Multnomah, and the Medicine Man (scout)] look into the river valley and spy the first White explorers coming to their region.  MacNeil portrays the Chief as tall, proud, and serene, while the Medicine Man is aroused, eager, and excited.  [See: " If MacNeil’s “Chiefs” Could Speak, What would They tell us Today? ].   

MacNeil considered the cost of shipping a stone from New York.  He decided it would cost too much.  But he knew what he wanted in a stone.  So he made a plaster model (that is what sculptors do).  The model was 1/3 the size of the stone that he wanted.  Then he shipped it with the statue to Portland.  He sent instructions that a stone be found sufficient for a base. 

When the statue arrived in Portland, Hermon came and found that no one had looked for a stone as he requested.  So he took his 1/3 plaster model, put it in a boat and traveled up the Columbia River to a granite quarry about 20 miles up river.  Leaving his plaster model in the boat, he went to the quarry and found a piece of granite sufficient to shape for a natural looking base.   Finding a suitable stone, he had it transported to a barge and them brought up the river.  At the foot of the hill where the statue was to be placed, it took a four horse team to pull the stone up the hill (this was 1904 remember).

MacNeil must have sculpted the base on site.  It bears the name of the statue and the information on the donor.  When looking at a sculpture I seldom take time to consider the base, pedestal, or the setting in which the sculptor, artist, architect may have placed it. I hope MacNeil’s story adds to your curiosity and appreciation of his work.

This photo shows the upper base of the statue as part of the casting itself with the name sculpted into the base. This sits on the boulder that MacNeil crafted for the setting from Columbis River granite. (Postcard courtesy of Gibson Shell, KC MO)


 

 

Gibson Shell has collected a book full of Hermon A. MacNeil photos, postcards, and memorabilia. Gib contributes photos regularly to this website. More to come. Stay tuned in 2012.

Happy 2012 from the Friends of Hermon Atkins MacNeil!

On Christmas Eve Day I had the pleasure of having breakfast in Kansas City, Missouri with Mr. Gibson Shell, one of Hermon’s biggest fans.

No stranger to HermonAtkinsMacNeil.com “Gib’s” photos and postcards have graced our pages for the last year. 

Neither is he a stranger to those of  you who frequent Coins Shows in the KC MO region and beyond.

Gib is an avid photographer and collector of Beaux Arts images (photos, postcards, souvenirs).  Gib has documented what he calls ‘MacNeil’s French Connection,’ namely, the works of Chapu and Falguière, MacNeil’s teachers in Paris.  Gib has gathered Sculptor Studies in MORE than a dozen Notebooks.

I enjoyed my tour through his Hermon MacNeil Notebook he is holding in this photo.  MacNeil studied at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and at the Julien Academy as a pupil of Henri M. Chapu and Alexandre Falguière.  Gib has an extensive collection of French postcards of their sculptures that MacNeil would have known and been influenced by.

I also was able to enjoy his Notebook of Daniel Chester French’s sculptures.  (French’s “Minuteman” statue at Concord elevated him into public prominence in 1875 at the tender age of 25.  His seated ‘Lincoln’ in the Lincoln Monument is his most famous work. French was on the Roman Rinehart Committee that awarded to Hermon MacNeil the first Rinehart scholarship in 1895. He also worked with MacNeil on the Columbian Exposition of 1893 in Chicago.  See Gib’s photos below of D. C. French’s “Republic” statue from the Fair ).

Next time I can see some of Gib’s other notebooks on Beaux Arts sculptors.   I wanted you to see this “friend of Hermon Atkins MacNeil and HermonAtkinsMacNeil.com”

Thanks Gib for being a contributor! He sent this photo of Daniel Chester French’s “Republic” to herald in 2012.  So once more:

HAPPY 2012 from CHICAGO! Daniel Chester French's centerpiece of the 1893 Chicago Fair greets you and (with her Blackbird) herald's in the New Year.

 INSPIRING AMERICANS for HER 3RD CENTURY

"Republic" raises the Old World symbols over the New World ~ the Globe and Eagle and the Laurel Wreath of Victory

P.S. 

We discovered that Gib lives 6 blocks from where my “Aunt Jane” McNeil Boody lived in Kansas City.  Jane and my mother, Ollie Frances McNeil both called Hermon MacNeil, “Uncle Hermon” all their lives. 

Webmaster Dan Leininger (lt.) and Gib Shel (rt.) share Hermon MacNeil facts, research, & trivia


"The Coming of the White Man" ~ MacNeil posed Black Pipe, the Sioux Warrior in Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show that he befriended after the 1893 Chicago Fair. (Antique Postcard courtesy of Gil Shell)

For our

Second MacNeil Postcard

we have selected  a re-run of this very old

color rendered photograph of the

“Coming of the White Man.”

Photo file courtesy of Gil Shell

This monument in Portland has a twin on the east coast in NYC that is in the Poppenhusen Institute in College Point, Queens, NYC.

This second statue is just down the street from Hermon A. MacNeil Park and the site of his old home and studio in Queens.  The sculpture was donated by Mr. MacNeil to this Cultural Center in his community.  It occupies an honored place in the stage-right corner of the auditorium.

See that twin photo here


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WHAT YOU FIND HERE.

Nearby or far away, there is no ONE place to go and appreciate this wide range of art pieces. Located in cities from east to west coast, found indoors and out, public and hidden, these creations point us toward the history and values in which our lives as Americans have taken root.

Webmaster: Daniel Neil Leininger ~ HAMacNeil@gmail.com
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Take a Virtual Journey

This website seeks to transport you through miles and years with a few quick clicks of a mouse or keyboard or finger swipes on an iPad.

Perhaps you walk or drive by one of MacNeil's many sculptures daily. Here you can gain awareness of this artist and his works.

For over one hundred years his sculptures have graced our parks, boulevards, and parkways; buildings, memorials, and gardens; campuses, capitols, and civic centers; museums, coinage, and private collections.

Maybe there are some near you!

PHOTOS WANTED: Be a WEBSITE contributor

WE DESIRE YOUR DIGITAL PHOTOS of MacNeil's work! Here's some photo suggestions:
1. Take digital photos of the entire work from several angles, including the surroundings.
2. Take close up photos of details that capture your imagination.
3. Look for MacNeil's signature, often on bronze works. Photograph it too! See examples above.
4. Please, include a photo of yourself and/or those with you standing beside the work.
5. Add your comments or a blog of your adventure. It adds personal interest for viewers.
6. Send photos to HAMacNeil@gmail.com Contact me there with any questions. ~~ Webmaster