WELCOME to the “Hermon A. MacNeil” — Virtual Gallery & Museum !

~ This Gallery celebrates Hermon Atkins MacNeil, American sculptor of the Beaux Arts School. MacNeil led a generation of sculptors in capturing many fading Native American images and American history in the realism of this classic style.

~ World’s Fairs, statues, public monuments, coins, and buildings across to country. Hot-links (on the lower right) lead to photos & info of works by MacNeil.

~ Hundreds of stories and photos posted here form this virtual MacNeil Gallery of works all across the U.S.A.  New York to New Mexico — Oregon to South Carolina.

~ 2016 marked the 150th Anniversary of Hermon MacNeil’s birth on February 27,

Take a Virtual Journey

Since 2010 this website has transported viewers through the years and miles between 100’s of Hermon MacNeil’s statues & monuments throughout the USA.

For over one hundred years these sculptures have graced our parks, boulevards, and parkways; buildings, memorials, and gardens; campuses, capitols, and civic centers; museums, coinage, and private collections.

PERHAPS,  you walk or drive by one of his public sculptures daily. HERE, you can gain awareness of this great sculptor and his many works.  Maybe there are some near you! CHECK HERE!

Search Results for "civil war philadelphia"

When the Students of Northwestern University saw MacNeil’s Female and Male statues in front of Patten Gym, they re-named them “Pat and Jim”

“Pat” or “Intellectual Development” is half of the pair of MacNeil creations that have graced the Northwestern campus for over 100 years.

“Jim” or “Physical Development” is the left-hand piece of the MacNeil pair placed in front of “Patten Gym” in 1919.

A bit of Sophmoric humor, perhaps, sure!  But “Pat & Jim”  are leading Northwestern into a 2nd century of campus smiles.

“Pat” bears a striking resemblance to another MacNeil lady, namely, “Prosperity” of the McKinley grouping. Perhaps they are related?  At least creations of the same creator.

WELCOME TO MacNEIL MONTH !

“Pat” of Patten Gym bears a resemblance to “Prosperity” of the McKinley Monument grouping.

“Prosperity” and her daughter “Peace” are bookends of the McKinley Monument.

 “They are still there” celebrates  MacNeil works visited in 2019.

This pair of Beaux Arts pieces are just two of hundreds of the works of Hermon Atkins MacNeil.

This years featured visits include:

  1. “The Sun Vow” in New York City and Monmouth, New Jersey. 
  2. “William McKinley” statue in Columbus, Ohio.
  3. The Patten Gym at Northwestern University ~ “Intellectual Development” and “Emotional Development”
  4. “The Soldiers and Sailors Monument” in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

SOLDIERS AND SAILORS MONUMENT  Philadelphia

Philadelphia – Hermon MacNeil – “Soldiers And Sailors Monument” – South pylon or Sailors side – Being photographed by Dan Leininger, webmaster).

Nice Packard! Nice Monument. 

We have purchased a rare period photograph of a historic Packard automobile which includes some of MacNeil’s public work in Philadelphia.  This monument was introduced earlier on this site.  [CLICK HERE]. (The Packard was not.)

The exact Packard model pictured here will be identified later. It appears to be from the 1928-1933 era. (Probably a  1929 Model 640 RunaboutSixth Series)[Actually a 1930 model – dnl]. 

In 1927 Hermon A. MacNeil sculpted the Philadelphia Soldiers and Sailors Monument that graces the Ben Franklin Parkway.

The Parkway way design was inspired by the Champs-Élysées in Paris, France with its Arc De Triomphe.  It commemorated many centuries of French military victories.

Philadelphia chose two grand pylons 60 feet tall rather than an Arch. It was to be Philadelphia’s version of a “grand avenue of heroes” leading out to the Philadelphia Art Museum. 

On these limestone pylons, Hermon A. MacNeil carved two Civil War monuments: one to the Soldiers and the second to the Sailor’s of the Civil War. After sixty (60) years, only a few of those who fought were still alive in 1927. This Monument was a tribute to their sacrifice and the “One Union” for which they fought. 

Philadelphia’s pride in that history is attributed in the following video celebration.

The Soldiers side of the monument is pictured more often than this Sailor’s side view.

Webmaster, Dan Leininger is a Packard owner and fanatic who possesses a less rare Packard. An older restoration of a 1941 Packard Clipper, the first of the Clipper line.

"Clipper Jack!" Dan's 1941 Packard Clipper as it appears 78 years after rolling out of the Detroit Packard Plant. later

“Clipper Jack!” Dan’s 1941 Packard Clipper as it appears 78 years after rolling out of the Detroit Packard Plant. Click  HERE for my “Hillbilly Packard Brothers” project blog on Packard Info.com 

 

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 ONE COUNTRY,   ONE CONSTITUTION,   ONE DESTINY

words from the Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Monument in Philadelphia

“IN GIVING FREEDOM TO THE SLAVE

WE ASSURE FREEDOM TO THE FREE”.  Abraham Lincoln

CLICK HERE for interpretive video

Early postcard (about 1927) shows the back of MacNeil's "Soldiers and Sailors" Monument looking east to the downtown. (Photo credit Gib Shell, KC,MO)

The Soldiers and Sailors Monument in Philadelphia By Hermon A. MacNeil was dedicated in 1927. Two 60 foot granite pylons mark the entrance to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The period automobiles and newly planted trees line the Parkway. This beautiful boulevard leads from Logan Circle through the rolling Parkway Gardens on up the hill to the Philadelphia Art Museums.

Hermon A. MacNeil's “Soldiers and Sailors Monuments” mark the entrance to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphia

Link

 

Hermon Atkins MacNeil, American Sculptor (1866-1947)

Click ‘MUSEUM …’ below – then PLAY


MUSEUM WITHOUT WALLS™: AUDIO –

“Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Memorial”

[from Fairmount Park Art Association on Vimeo.]

“ONE COUNTRY, ONE CONSTITUTION, ONE DESTINY”

 

This Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Monument was dedicated in 1927.  The Monument consists of two 60 foot granite pylons.  These pillars mark the entrance to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway.  This beautiful boulevard leads from Logan Circle through the rolling Parkway Gardens on up the hill to the Philadelphia Art Museums.

  • Find the Soldiers panel and Civil War history  HERE.
  • The Soldiers pylon is pictured below =>

The Soldiers side of the monument

  • For DIRECTIONS to this Monument see the Google Map below.

We hope to have our own photos to post at a future date.

Meanwhile, thanks to the citizens and public officials of Philly for this tribute to American history and the work of Hermon Atkins MacNeil.

 

Happy Birthday Rachel!

 

 

 

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CLICK HERE to see March for George Floyd  as they pass

George Washington by Hermon A. MacNeil. 

Above the rally, MacNeil’s likeness of General Washington guarded the rear flanks of the marchers.

Protesters marched at Washington Square Park in Manhattan on Monday. (June 9, 2020) [Credit…Demetrius Freeman for The New York Times]

The photo shows H. A. MacNeil‘s statue of George Washington looking down on 1000’s of Protesters as they remember George Floyd and march for Justice two weeks after his death at the hands of four Minneapolis Police officers. 

MacNeil’s statue has seen many protests in its 104 years up on that pedestal of the arch, BUT nothing as moving as this.  Alexander Sterling Calders statue of President Washington looks on from the left at the crowd.  (FOR Bernie Sanders Rally in 2016, CLICK HERE)

 

The New York Times Reports:

Protests continue nationwide, with signs of an ebb after dark.

Two weeks after George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis, demonstrations against police violence continued to fill the streets of cities and towns across the country on Monday.

About 1,000 protesters gathered in Los Angeles near a memorial for those killed by the police. Thousands more called for police reforms before a City Council meeting in Charlotte, N.C. And more than 1,000 made their way to a march that began in Washington Square Park in Manhattan.

“This is a young, young revolution,” said Vidal Guzman, 29, as he led marchers down Fifth Avenue in New York. “These are teenagers, people in their 20s, 30-year-olds. We have energy. We believe in what we’re doing, and we’re not going to let up.”

Still, there were signs in parts of the country that the demonstrations that have raged through cities after dark over the past two weeks appeared to be ramping down in many places.

PHILADELPHIA – Another BLM Protest march passes the March down the Ben Franklin Parkway from the Art Museum to City Hall.

The Rally-goers pass between the two 60 foot columns of MacNeil, Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Monument

PHILADELPHIA — Thousands of people demanding justice for George Floyd flooded the streets of downtown Philadelphia on Saturday, chanting “No justice, no peace!”

Demonstrators gathered near the Philadelphia Museum of Art and its famous “Rocky” steps before setting off for the City Hall area, with the line of marchers stretching for several city blocks along the tree-lined Benjamin Franklin Parkway.

The protesters circled City Hall, clapping and shouting, “Black Lives Matter!” as some residents of an apartment building held signs on their balconies reading “BLM” and “Keep Going, Philly,” the Philadelphia Inquirer reported.

To police officers and National Guard members, they chanted: “What do we want? Justice! When do we want it? Now!”

Qadir Sabur, 22, handing out water and snacks and holding a sign that read “Don’t just say Black Lives Matter, show us,” said that in addition to opposition to police brutality, African Americans in the city should benefit from the same opportunities in jobs and education.

SOLDIERS AND SAILORS MONUMENT  Philadelphia

Philadelphia – Hermon MacNeil – “Soldiers And Sailors Monument” – South pylon or Sailors side – Being photographed by Dan Leininger, webmaster).

PHILADELPHIA —->>>

 

~ “Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Monument” ~ Soldiers side North Pylon 

Photos: Solidarity on The Square protest in Carlisle PA on Saturday (June 6, 2020)

“I’m not just seeing blacks come together today as one,” he said, “I’m seeing everyone coming together as one,” he told the Inquirer.

By late afternoon, many protesters had left but others lingered around the Art Museum area or along the parkway. Smaller demonstrations were held in other areas, including one by the African American Museum in Philadelphia near Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell.

City officials earlier announced street closures, saying much of the city center, from the Delaware River to the Schuylkill River, would be closed to vehicles. A curfew will be in effect again overnight, from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m., during which time only people with essential duties are allowed out.

Smaller groups also marched in other cities around the state, including several hundred in Pittsburgh and the surrounding area.

Floyd, who was black, died on May 25 after a white Minneapolis police officer pressed a knee into his neck even as he pleaded for air and stopped moving. His death has sparked protests over police treatment of African Americans and racial injustice nationwide

Pennsylvania Governor speaks on the Rally s and needed reforms for Pennsylvania: CLICK HERE:

b5289af0-1847-11e5-b170-9d0f9ec45daa_CICJzhhWsAE1Dj_Down the street from The Mother Emmanuel AME Church where nine members were massacred this week while worshiping God in prayer and Bible study stands the Confederate Defenders monument sculpted by Hermon MacNeil.  The memorial was defaced with spray paint on Sunday.   

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2015/06/21/21/29D7C09E00000578-3133597-Confederate_monument_vandalized-a-58_1434918039434.jpg

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2015/06/21/21/29D7C09E00000578-3133597-Confederate_monument_vandalized-a-58_1434918039434.jpg

Hermon A. MacNeil’s only Confederate monument stands on Battery Point on Charleston Harbor facing out to Fort Sumter 3 1/2 miles away where the first shots of the Civil War was fired .  The monument was commissioned for this site in 1932 by The United Daughters of the Confederacy.  It has stood for 83 years.  

MacNeil’s design was chosen by a local monument committee over all other entries.  The allegorical piece depicts the Youth of defenders and the Maternal figure of culture.  The shield contains the Seal of the State of South Carolina (the first to succeed from the Union).

Succession Gala:   For my own comments on a previous Confederate Celebration and remembrance see this post on this website: “MacNeil Statue will not attend Secession Gala” By (https://hermonatkinsmacneil.com/2010/12/12/macneil-statue-will-not-attend-secession-gala/)

 It is unlike any other Civil War Monuments that Hermon MacNeil created.  SEE the following links:

  1. Whitinsville, Massachusetts ( 1905 Monument to Soldiers & Sailors of the Civil War~ Whitinsville, Massachusetts );
  2. Albany, NY ( 1912 Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Albany,NY );
  3. Philadelphia Pennsylvania ( 1927 Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Monument ~ Philadelphia, PA );

A June 21st report by Melissa Boughton of The Post and Courrier gives the following details:

The damage was reported to police dispatchers just after 12:30 p.m. The statue was covered up by residents who wrapped a large tarp around it about 1:30 p.m.

Two signs were placed on the tarp after the graffiti was covered up. One said, “All lives matter #charlestonunited,” and the other said, “Take down racist statues.”

The incident occurred in the wake of the fatal shooting Wednesday of nine black people inside Emanuel AME Church in what police say was an attack by a white supremacist. The church held its first service since the shootings on Sunday.

The attack has led to a nationwide call for South Carolina to remove the Confederate battle flag from the Statehouse grounds. At least 1,000 people gathered Saturday in Columbia to call for the flag to be taken down. Numerous petitions also call for the flag’s removal.  ( http://www.postandcourier.com/article/20150621/PC16/150629854/confederate-monument-a-focus-of-debate-after-graffiti-appears )

EP-150629854.jpg&Maxw=620&q=85

Xavier Rosado and Tighe Berry argue about graffiti discovered, and later covered up, on a Confederate statue downtown near The Battery. http://www.postandcourier.com/article/20150621/PC16/150629854/confederate-monument-a-focus-of-debate-after-graffiti-appears

FOR MORE HISTORY on this work by HERMON MACNEIL see the following:

The vandalism that left the words ‘Black lives matter’ on a statue dedicated to the ‘Confederate defenders of Charleston’ was reported to police just after 12:30 p.m. on Sunday. http://www.nydailynews.com/news/crime/statue-honoring-confederacy-defaced-charleston-park-article-1.2266043

 

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WHAT YOU FIND HERE.

Nearby or far away, there is no ONE place to go and appreciate this wide range of art pieces. Located in cities from east to west coast, found indoors and out, public and hidden, these creations point us toward the history and values in which our lives as Americans have taken root.

Webmaster: Daniel Neil Leininger ~ HAMacNeil@gmail.com
Hosting & Tech Support: Leiturgia Communications, Inc.
COME BACK & WATCH US GROW

WE DESIRE YOUR DIGITAL PHOTOS – Suggestions

1. Take digital photos of the entire work from several angles, including the surroundings.
2. Take close up photos of details that capture your imagination.
3. Look for MacNeil’s signature, often on bronze works. Photograph it too! See examples above.
4. Please, include a photo of yourself and/or those with you standing beside the work.
5. Add your comments or a blog of your adventure. It adds personal interest for viewers.
6. Send photos to HAMacNeil@gmail.com Contact me there with any questions. ~~ Webmaster