WELCOME to the “Hermon A. MacNeil” — Virtual Gallery & Museum !

~ This Gallery celebrates Hermon Atkins MacNeil of the Beaux Arts School, an American classic sculptor of Native images and American history:  ~ World’s Fairs, statues, monuments, coins, and more… ~ Hot-links ( lower right) lead to works by Hermon Atkins MacNeil.   ~ Over 300 stories in 50 pages & thousands of photos form this virtual MacNeil Gallery stretching from New York to New Mexico ~ Oregon to S. Carolina.   ~ 2016 marked the 150th Anniversary of Hermon MacNeil’s birth. ~~Do you WALK or DRIVE by MacNeil sculptures DAILY!  ~ CHECK OUT Uncle Hermon’s works here!

Daniel Neil Leininger, webmaster

DO YOU walk by MacNeil Statues and NOT KNOW IT ???

Search Results for "eagles nest"

 ‘MacNeil Month’ becomes ‘MacNeil~Brooks Month’ in 2023

Hermon A MacNeil about 1895

Carol ‘Carrie’ Brooks about 1895

Each February is MacNeil Month.This year it is MacNeil~Brooks Month

<- Two Sculptors made a young looking pair ->

From their first meeting at the

Chicago Worlds Fair of 1893,

to the Eagles Nest**

[a summer artist colony in Oregon, Illinois.] 

then the Reinhart Award of 1895;

Hermon and Carrie knew what they wanted next.   So…

Hermon MacNeil and Carol ‘Carrie’ Brooks

were married on Christmas Day 1895.

Here’s Hermon and Carrie nestled with some visiting MacNeils.

Left to right: Hermon, Carrie, Alice MacNeil (Hermon’s sister), Wilbur MacNeil (Hermon’s younger Brother), and Elizabeth Louisa Barlow (Wilbur’s wife). The child is Claude (son of Hermon and Carrie.  Location: Side porch of MacNeil home at College Point, N.Y.  [Credit: Photo courtesy of James Haas, MacNeil biographer].

Our first MacNeil-Brooks Month photo for 2023 comes to us courtesy of:

James Haas, Hermon MacNeil biographer ==>

Jim dates the photo above as 1903. After identifying Hermon, Carrie, and Alice, he adds:

“The child sitting on his (Wilbur’s) lap is probably his nephew Claude, born in France in 1900. The woman to his left is Elizabeth Barlow who Wilbur had married in California in 1901. After earning a Master’s degree in Agriculture at Cornell where Hermon had taught, he moved to California to teach science in Petaluma high school. There he met and married Elizabeth Louisa Barlow a teacher in the Petaluma elementary school. In 1903 they left California for Honolulu; the photo likely taken prior to their departure.  For the rest of his life Wilbur taught science at Oahu College later called Punahou School. During a visit in 1911, Hermon modeled a portrait bust of Elizabeth Barlow found on page 162 in Hermon Atkins MacNeil: American Sculptor in the Broad, Bright Daylight. During the visit, Hermon gave Wilbur a tour of the Poppenhusen Institute. He admired the building’s architecture, looked in on classes and was introduced to school head John Gyger Embree as well as faculty members and other Institute Trustees. Wilbur died in 1937, a highly regarded educator. The couple had no children.

Then Jim adds a 21st Century surprise:

a MacNeil ~ Obama connection!

If Punahou School sounds familiar, it was from this school that Barack Obama graduated.

Barack Obama    (Class of ’79) was the 44th President of the United States. He attended Punahou from 5th grade until graduation. (’79), Harvard Law Review editor, U Chicago lecturer on Constitutional Law, Nobel, Grammy and Emmy winner, author, state basketball champion, US Senator, Elected 44th US President in 2008 and 2012.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

SOURCE:  Brooklyn Daily Star, March 15,1911 [Courtesy of James Haas]

Wilbur MacNeil also visited

his brother Hermon in 1911.

Wilbur MacNeil toured the Poppenhusen Institute in College Point, Queens, NYC.  (See news clipping)

Wilbur MacNeil was a distinguished visitor touring the Institute.  He was escorted by two trustees of the Institute, namely, Dr. Hugh Gray and Hermon MacNeil (Wilbur’s older brother)

Jim Haas adds that “Dr. Hugh Gray was a physician in College Point between 1905 and 1915.  His wife Geretrude was the daughter of Hermon Pratt, whoise sister was Mary Lash Pratt MacNeil.”

 

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

Why is February is so special?
Hermon MacNeil was born on February 27, 1866

Hermon’s older cousin, Tom Henry MacNeil (my grandfather),

was born on February 29th, 1860. 

So February is MacNeil~Brooks Month in several ways.

This is the first of several postings that will celebrate this theme. 

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

Related posts:

  1. Hermon MacNeil and Hamlin Garland ~ ~ Connections Through the Years – Part 3 (8) Hermon MacNeil met Hamlin Garland in Chicago. Hermon MacNeil Hermon…
  2. ~ ~ ~ “The Most Happy Young Man I Know” ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Hermon A. MacNeil ~ Success & Marriage! (7) 1895 Hermon Atkins MacNeil, American Sculptor (1866-1947) MacNeil’s bronze of…
  3. Hermon MacNeil ~ “The Most Happy Young Man I Know!” (6) ~ Christmas Day 1895 ~ In 1895, Amy Aldis Bradley…
  4. The MacNeil’s Chicago Wedding – Christmas Day 1895 (6) I sit here in Chicago during this Christmas Season, imagining…
  5. Hermon MacNeil’s ~~ Friend and Guide in 1895 ~~ “HAMLIN GARLAND” Grew up in South Dakota ~ [#1] (6) The Hamlin Garland Memorial Highway ~ Brown County, South Dakota…
  6. A 1894 Sculpture of Charles F. Browne ~ ~ ~ by Hermon A. MacNeil. (6) Out of public view, deep in the archives of the…

Related Images:

Out of public view, deep in the archives of the Chicago Art Institute rests a 127 year old bust of Charles F. Browne,  American artist.

Cast in Bronze with a dark brown patina, the piece is signed on pedestal; “MacNeil ’94” / “American Art Bronze Foundry. J. Berchem. / Chicago”

Charles Francis Browne, MacNeil Colleague and American Artist.

The subject was Hermon MacNeil’s colleague, frontier traveling companion, and studio mate in their Marquette Building studio.  The piece came out of their years in Chicago after the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition.

The archival piece enters its third century of history “OFF VIEW” at the archives of  the Art Institute of Chicago.  Here we offered it exclusively to You, —“Friends of Hermon Atkins MacNeil”  —  & followers of ‘HermonAtkinsMacNeil.com’.   ENJOY !!

1895.   With Hamlin Garland as their guide, the pair rode by train and horse back to the south west territories of the Navajo, Hopi, (Moqui). MacNeil recalled years later, “We found Indians a plenty and perhaps because I was keenly interested in them I was in heaven and I flared to a high pitch, working from sunrise to dark. …”

“Browne painted murals for the Children’s Building at the World’s Columbian Exposition and became an instructor at the Art Institute of Chicago’s rapidly growing school.” 2

Hamilin Garland and Browne were “double” brothers-in-law having married sisters of Lorado Taft, the chief sculptor of the Exposition. Taft was the brother of both of their wives.  They all along with MacNeil were part of the Eagles Nest, a summer artist  colony in Oregon, Illinois.  Browne was a founder of the summer group.

Portrait of Charles F. Browne by H. A. MacNeil 1894. Art Institute of Chicago. [Signed on pedestal; “MacNeil ’94” / “American Art Bronze Foundry. J. Berchem. / Chicago”] 1

The adventure in the Summer of 1895 shaped the lives of all three men, but especially MacNeil who evolved an enduring interest in the Native American Indian as a subject of Beaux Arts sculpture.  

The dating of the bust of C. F. Browne precedes their venture to the Southwest Territory but documents the shared years of their early careers in the 19th century.  

Writing in 1943, MacNeil recalls these years in Chicago:

“I took a small studio in Chicago and tried to see if I could make a go of it. C. F. Browne, painter, was also stranded there and I invited him to share a studio with me. During that year (evenings) I was asked to teach sculpture and drawing in the school of the Art Institute and also had the good fortune to have four bas-reliefs to do illustrating the life of Pere Marquette.”  [ MacNeil, Autobiography

MacNeil’s four bas-reliefs of the life of Pere Marquette still make frame the four-door entrance of the building

The Marquette Building panels after cleaning efforts several years ago sparkle with history and beauty at the 140 South Dearborn Street entrance.

Chicago Architecture celebrated the building renovation and mentioned the 126 year old sculpture panels”

“At the main entrance are four bronze relief sculptures by Hermon A. MacNeil illustrating Father Marquette and Louis Joliet’s travels. They depict the pair launching their canoes, meeting Native Americans, arriving at the Chicago River, and interring Marquette’s body. On the revolving doors are kick plates with tomahawks and push plates with panther heads designed by Edward Kemeys (of the Art Institute lions fame). The vestibule features French and Catholic motifs like fleurs-de-lis and the cross.” 

~ ~ ~ ~  Chicago Art Institute Notations for this work ~ ~ ~ ~

Portrait of Charles F. Browne by H. A. MacNeil 1894.

Portrait of Charles Francis Browne.  Date: 1894
Artist: Hermon Atkins MacNeil.  American, 1866–1947
ABOUT THIS ARTWORK:  Currently Off View

SOURCES:

  1. Art Institute of Chicago. Portrait of Charles Frances Brown by Hermon MacNeil.    https://www.artic.edu/artworks/102974/portrait-of-charles-francis-browne
  2. See Also:  M Christine Schwartz Collection.  https://schwartzcollection.com/artist/charles-francis-browne/

 

Related Images:

WHAT YOU FIND HERE.

Here is ONE place to go to see sculpture of Hermon A. MacNeil & his students. Located in cities from east to west coast, found indoors and out, public and private, these creations point us toward the history and values that root Americans.

Daniel Neil Leininger ~ HAMacNeil@gmail.com
Hosting & Tech Support: Leiturgia Communications, Inc.           WATCH US GROW

WE DESIRE YOUR DIGITAL PHOTOS – Suggestions

1. Take digital photos of the work from all angles, including setting.
2. Take close up photos of details that you like
3. Look for MacNeil’s signature. Photograph it too! See examples above.
4. Please, include a photo of you & others beside the work.
5. Tell your story of adventure. It adds personal interest.
6. Send photos to ~ Webmaster at: HAMacNeil@gmail.com