WELCOME to the “Hermon A. MacNeil” — Virtual Gallery & Museum !

~ This Gallery celebrates Hermon Atkins MacNeil,  of the Beaux Arts School American classic sculptor of Native images and American history.  ~ World’s Fairs, statues, monuments, coins, and more… ~ Hot-links ( lower right) lead to works by Hermon A. MacNeil.   ~ Over 200 of stories & 2,000 photos form this virtual MacNeil Gallery stretching east to west  New York to New Mexico ~ Oregon to S. Carolina.   ~ 2021 marks the 155th Anniversary of Hermon MacNeil’s birth. ~~Do you WALK or DRIVE by MacNeil sculptures DAILY!   ~~ CHECK it OUT!

DO YOU walk by MacNeil Statues and NOT KNOW IT ???

Search Results for "poppenhusen institute"

The Poppenhusen Institute (just blocks from the site of MacNeil’s Studio and home) in College Point, Queens, NYC has made an urgent Appeal for $3000.  The money will secure the shipment and handling of several MacNeil Statues being donated to the Institute.

The Poppenhusen Institute houses this plaster model of “A Chief of the Multnomah” donated in 1920 by MacNeil. It represents half of the “Coming of the White Man” grouping comissioned in 1904 for the City of Portland, Oregon by the family of David P. Thompson. (photo courtesy of Bob Walker, College Point)

An Appeal

The Landmark Poppenhusen Institute in College Point, Queens has been presented with the opportunity to obtain a number of statues by Hermon Atkins Mac Neil. We are anxious to accept this offer since Mac Neil was the head of the art department at the Institute for many years and also served as its president. He also lived in this community for more than 40 years.

The cost of packing, and transporting these sculptures is $3,000. Won’t you consider contributing to this cause. You can learn more about the Institute, visit our website at www.poppenhuseninstitute.org.

“We are a 501(c)(3) charitable organization and therefore all donations are tax deductible, under the Internal Revenue Code.

Checks can be sent to: Poppenhusen Institute, P.O. Box 91, College Point, NY 11356

Thank you for your anticipated support.

Susan Brustmann

Bob Walker (illustrator, sculptor, and long time College Point resident), has informed us just yesterday of these needs and developments.  He also sent the wonderful detail photo of “The Coming of the White Man” shown above. This plaster model is MacNeil’s original sculpture from which the Portland bronze grouping was cast by Bureau Brothers foundry of Los Angeles.  This original work is on display in the auditorium of the Institute. Bob has also told us that:

These plaster works will be joined by other pieces by MacNeil being donated to become in the future, a substantial MacNeil collection to be exhibited at Poppenhusen.

The Poppenhusen Institute built in 1868 by Conrad Poppenhusen was established to be a learning institute open to all people providing the opportunity to improve their lives by offering adult education and the first free kindergarten in the USA in 1870. It continues to serve the community by offering Theater groups, Music and Art programs, Lectures, Historic exhibits and creative workshops for children.

Susan Brustmann and her dedicated staff have done an amazing job of keeping the Institute together with creativity and hard work.

 

 

This request for funds is a first step in expanding the MacNeil Collection of the Institute.  Thanks to the Poppenhusen Institute, its donors, and the people of College Point, Queens, the MacNeil Collection there can be expanded.

MacNeil Park was dedicated by Mayor Lindsey in 1967. That act permanently placed the name of Hermon A. MacNeil” in the community he and Carol loved, and where their home and studio stood for 50 years.

Bob Walker has lived in College Point for 46 years just a few blocks from the site of the MacNeil studio and home. Bob also gives us the ultimate web-surfer compliment, “I have really enjoyed your website as I am a fan of MacNeil’s work and I’m grateful to find a site dedicated to his sculpture.” (Thanks Bob for your ongoing contribution here as well. – webmaster Dan)

 

PLEASE HELP these MacNeil sculptures to come home to College Point. Send your check today to: Poppenhusen Institute, P.O. Box 91, College Point, NY 11356

Hermon served as president of the Poppenhusen Institute board and donated the his original plaster model. Click in this link for a stunning photo and the Poppenhusen story — “The Coming of the White Man” .

A previous post here tells the whole story.  CLICK HERE.

[mappress mapid=”33″]

 

We have just discovered that MacNeil’s “Coming of the White Man” on the west coast has a twin on the east coast. This recent finding was made while researching the website of the Poppenhusen Institute of Queens, Long Island, New York.  The institute is located just blocks from the site of Hermon A. MacNeil’s home and studio in College Point.

"Coming of the White Man" in Washington Park, Portland Oregon was made on 1904 and has an indoor twin sculpture in the Poppenhusen Institute in New York.

Nestled in the trees of Portland Oregon’s Washington Park, the artwork pictured here steps out of the 19th Century time machine. Its location keeps it off the track of tourists except for adventurous hikers on a bit of a treasure hunt? (Go to 25th and Burnside and climb all the stairs!)

Likewise, the New York twin is also secluded but indoors rather than outdoors.  Inside the auditorium (ballroom) of the Poppenhusen Institute is a  second “Coming of the White Man” . Apparently, this holding was a gift by the artist to his neighborhood Cultural and Art center.  The Institute was a gift of Conrad Poppenhusen to the community that he founded and developed that eventually became College Point.  MacNeil and other artists lived there to be near the Roman Bronze Works, a prominent art foundry of that period.

The Institute’s website states:


Popenhusen Institute in more recent years remains a historic site and Community Cultural Center for Flushing, NY.

“This sculpture, of Tachoma’s first view of the white man, was a gift to the institute by Hermon A MacNeil. The park at 115th Street on the East River is named after him as this was where is studio once stood.”

Click HERE for a brief virtual tour of this statue at Poppenhusen Institute.

Click HERE for a facebook link to this statue at Poppenhusen Institute.

The Portland statue was a gift of the family of David P. Thompson after his death. His biography on Wikipedia states in part:

“David Preston Thompson (1834-1901) was an American businessman and politician in the Pacific Northwest. He was governor of the Idaho Territory from 1875 to 1876. A native of Ohio, he immigrated to the Oregon Territory in 1853. In Oregon, Thompson would become a wealthy business man, and served in the Oregon Legislative Assembly both before and after his time in Idaho, with election to both chambers of the legislature.”

Web links: – Poppenhusen Institute – Virtual Tour (16 sec)  MacNeil\’s \’Coming of the White Man\’ at Poppenhusen Institute

“The Poppenhusen Institute was built in 1868 with funds donated by Conrad Poppenhusen, the benefactor of College Point. The original charter specified that it be open to all, irrespective of race, creed or religion, giving people the opportunity to improve their lives either by preparing them for better job or improving their leisure time.” (see website at above link)

[mappress]

Alexander Hamilton plaster model (reverse) with de-assession tag at Swope Art Museum

Plaster models from the studio of

Hermon Atkins MacNeil

are returning to College Point thanks to.  

James Haas

(MacNeil biographer and College Point author)

Hermon Atkins MacNeil: American Sculptor In the Broad, Bright Daylight

Jim Haas, with help from Charlie Chiclacos, traveled to

Swope Art Museum

in Terre Haute, Indiana,

where the plasters have been in storage since 1947 after the death of the sculptor.  His widow Cecelia MacNeil released them from the  MacNeil estate
 

Jim Haas and Charlie Chiclacos, drove a rental van to Terre Haute last month to retrieve the pieces.

One rescued piece is the Adventurous Bowman model (1915). The final plaster stood atop the Column of Progress at the Pan-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco (See photos below)

“Column of Progress” with MacNeil’s “Adventurous Bowman” as the finial figure on top.

Adventurous Bowman model (1915). The final plaster stood atop the Column of Progress at the Pan-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco

Swope Art Museum received the remaining plaster models from the original MacNeil Studio before it was sold and demolished.  

 
The Bowman plaster has a broken arm and bow.   < See photos above and below.>  The pieces seem intact enough for possible repair. 
 
Since the Pan-Pacific Exposition closed in 1916  all buildings and monuments were demolished.    This broken model is the only remnant of depicting the “Adventurous Bowman.”
    
The MacNeil home and studio were occupied for several years, but once the property was sold both buildings were demolished. The site of the MacNeil Studio and home were prime real estate located on the East River Sound adjoining Chisholm Park
 
In 1966, the centennial of Hermon’s birth, the City of New York renamed that park as:
 
 “MacNeil Park”
 
to honor the name of the Sculptor-couple who lived and worked there in College Point for half a century.  A condominium complex stands on the original site of the MacNeil property.
 
The Poppenheusen Institute will be the new caretaker of these pieces.

Hermon MacNeil served on the board there.  His plaster of “The White Man Coming” has been displayed there for nearly a century. (See below)

“Coming of the White Man” original clay model 72 inches high at the Poppenhusen Institute in College Point, Queens, New York.

 
Unsuccessful efforts were made a decade ago to bring these MacNeil remnants home to College Point . (Click to see the George Washington piece)
 
Seventy-five years have passed since the sculptor’s death in 1947. 
 

 

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STAY TUNED FOR MORE ON THIS STORY
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~  ~ ~ ~
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Categories : Location
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~ MacNeil “Chief  of Multnomah” ~

 

Earns Surprising Sale Price!

 
SOURCE: https://www.askart.com/Artist_Art_For_Sale_Inquiry.aspx?adno=202382&artist=110997
 
 
 
 
A 37 inch half-height copy of
 
Hermon MacNeil’s
 
 
“Chief of the Multnomah”
 
sold for a WORLD Record at
 
The Coeur d’Alene Art Auction
 
Reno, Nevada
 
Estimated sale price was in the range of
 
$30,000-50,000.
 

The Coeur d’Alene Art Auction Image of the 37 inch version of the MacNeil piece.

 
 
 
“A CHIEF OF THE MULTNOMAH TRIBE”
(1905)
 
Hermon Atkins MacNeil
 
In 2021 the Coeur d’Alene Art Auction offered an artwork for sale by Hermon Atkins MacNeil.
 
Actual Sale Price: 
 
$351,000
 
Title:
A Chief of the Multnomah Tribe
(1905)
 
Type:  Sculpture
Medium:  Bronze
Style:  Other
Subject:  Western/Indian
Signature:  Signed and Dated
Size:  37.00″ x 12.00″
Foundry Mark:  Roman Bronze Works N-Y-
 
Description:  Estimate $30,000-50,000.
SOLD FOR $351,000 ~ A WORLD-RECORD
AT THE COEUR D’ALENE ART AUCTION-RENO!
Now taking consignments for our 2022 auction.
For more information please call 208.772.9009 or
 

“Coming of the White Man” original clay model 72 inches high at the Poppenhusen Institute in College Point, Queens, New York.

 
This “Chief of the Mulnomah Tribe” was a 37″ statue.
 
It was half the height
 
of the 74″
Chief
sculpted for the original 
“Coming of the
White Man”
seen at right ==>
in the original clay model
now at the
Poppenhusen Institute 
in College Point where MacNeil donated it before his death.
 
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
 
“Chief of the Multnomah”
 
Here are MORE Postings on this site:
1).

Another of Hermon MacNeil’s “Chief of the Multnomah” Discovered in Vernon, New Jersey  Posted on May, 31, 2015 

Another Chief of the Mulnomah

Another Chief of the Multnomah

I’ve been noticing a magnificent piece of the scultpture for the past few years, located in Vernon N.J. at the Minerals Spa and Resort. After closer examination I discovered it is Chief Multnomah with his arms crossed, standing on tip toes looking outward. “The coming of the white man” is the title usually ascribed to this work, but in this case the chief stands alone without his scout or assistant as pictured on your web-site. It is signed simply, H.A. Macneil S.C. 04. Just thought it was a variation of the piece that you might find interesting.I’m not really sure how long its been there, because I’m relatively new to the area. Being a sculptor myself and one that is particularly fond on the late 19th cent/early 20th cent period, with the likes of Rodin, Bayre, Dega, etc. Macneil certainly is a strong and salutory member of that period. Regards, D. Moldoff.

My response was as follows:

Dear D. L. Moldoff,

Thanks for noticing sculpture around you and sharing the information.  The ‘Chief Multnomah’ is the larger Half of H. A. MacNeil’s “The Coming of the White Man.” (COTWM). While the COTWM piece is only at the Washington Park in Portland, OR, where it was commissioned for that city.  The original plaster sculpture model is in the Poppenhusen Institute in Queens, NYC, just blocks from MacNeil’s studio.

2).

“Chief of the Multnomah” ~ DO WE HAVE ONE? ~ ???????  Posted on Dec 21, 2013 

In the Summer of 2013, I received an email from Linette Porter-Metler of the Mount Vernon and Knox County Library of Mount Vernon, Ohio.  She enclosed the photos you see below.

Linette entitled her email,

“DO WE HAVE ONE?”

Here is what she said:

Thanks for your website!

We are a four-library public library system in Central Ohio.  All year, we have been celebrating our 125th Anniversary here as a public library in Mount Vernon, Ohio, and during our research we found that one of our sculptures donated to us in 1936 by a Dr. Freeman Ward may be one of The Chief of the Multnomah statues shown on your site. But it does have some differences as you can see by the photo compared to the one on your site at the New York museum.

Ours does not seem to have a number stating it was one of the copies (i.e. 4/20)..All it has is his name, the word “Multnomah”, and the number “03” etched on the side of his footrest. I will send photos. Also, there is a copper? Twisted piece at top of bow near his shoulder.

I will enclose as many photos as I can.  If you have any further information to share with us about this, we would appreciate it!

Thanks!

Linette Porter-Metler, Community Relations / Public Affairs, Public Library of Mount Vernon and Knox County, 201 N. Mulberry Street, Mount Vernon, OHIO

My answer is simply:

YES,  MT. VERNON,

YOU HAVE ONE !

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

3).

Another “Chief of the Multnomah” Has Appeared in the East.    Posted on Nov, 10, 2011 

One of MacNeil’s  “Chief of the Multnomah Tribe”, (which has seen a lot in American history since 1904, and even more since “The Coming of the White Man”) still  stands guard silently over a once $25,000,000 estate in Easton, MD, known as Hidden Bridge Farm.   The future of both the “Chief” and the Estate remain uncertain.  The waterfront playground  property is now locked in Chapter 7 bankruptcy being handled by Easton attorney, James Vidmar.


These photos show  “A Chief of the Multnomah” as he overlooks the  Choptank River on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.  This same MacNeil statue featured in the previous posting on Nov. 8, 2011 was once owned by John A. Porter.  

A source has told us that the “Chief” was placed as the centerpiece on  this 540-acre Estate  by “John A. Porter.”  Porter achieved front page fame as the former CEO of Worldcom before its colossal collapse in 2000-2.  The scandal brought Worldcom into the news as the “Enron” of the tele-communication industry.

Daniela Deane, House Gossip for the Washington Post, described the situation  in 2002 in this way:

Hidden Bridge Farm, a 540-acre spread with five houses on it, is for sale for $26.5 million — about $16.5 million more than any other property has sold for on the Eastern Shore. The farm sits on 1.5 miles of waterfront on the Choptank River, about 10 miles southwest of Easton.

Besides the 10,000-square-foot all-brick manor house, the property also has a waterfront farmhouse, a 3,000-square-foot guest house, a caretaker’s house, a guest cottage and two two-bedroom …  Source: [ Daniela Deane. “House gossip; Eastern Shore Estate Asks a Record Price.” The Washington Post. Washingtonpost Newsweek Interactive. 2002. Retrieved November 08, 2011 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P2-325206 ]           

Deane’s story details one of the holdings of  John A. Porter who was worth over $500,000,000 in 1999.  Now, however, he is broke.  After loosing the Maryland property and “Chief Multnomah,”  he has had  to scale down to a 10,000 sq foot ocean-front mansion in Palm Beach.  That little homestead retreat is worth much less than Hidden Bridge only about $17,000,000.  Fortunately, Florida has a generous “Homestead Act”, known by locals as the “mansion loophole” act.

Some folks suggest that you might be able to “buy the farm” for possibly $14 Million, once it comes on the market.  The “Chief “  may (or may not) be included in the selling price.

 

4).

If MacNeil’s “Chiefs” Could Speak, What would They tell us Today?  Posted on Nov 13, 2011

.

(Photo by Elizabeth Daley, Queens Chronicle) Posted on June 1, 2011

A recent estate auction featured a “Chief of the Multnomah” which is the right-hand half of the “Coming of the White Man” pair.

“Everything Must Go” was a feature story in the “Queens Chronicle” by Elizabeth Daley, editor (March 11, 2011).  Michael Halberian lived in the former Steinway Family Mansion.  It is uncertain whether the MacNeil sculpture was a Steinway heirloom that sold with the mansion or whether Mike discovered it in his appraisal work.

 

 

 

 

The Poppenhusen Institute houses this plaster model of “A Chief of the Multnomah” donated in 1920 by MacNeil. It represents half of the “Coming of the White Man” grouping comissioned in 1904 for the City of Portland, Oregon by the family of David P. Thompson. (photo courtesy of Bob Walker, College Point)

“A Chief of the Multnomah” is silent, but If he could only speak and share his observations of 150 years with the White Man 

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Rarest of the Rare!   A very rare Silver – Society of Medalists #3 – by ‘H. A. MacNeil’ (in lower right).

It is “Silver.”

Only twenty-five were minted in 1931.

In the summer of 1895, Hermon MacNeil traveled to the Southwest.  With Hamlin Garland and Charles Francis Browne, they journey by railroad to the four-corners region of New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado and Utah.

With Garland as guide the sculptor and the artist witnessed Native American culture first hand. They visited the Hopi and Navajo reservations immersed in Native American life. They saw the “Prayer for Rain” ~ the Snake Dance ceremony depicted here on the SOM #3.

The “Prayer for Rain” depicts the Moqui (Hopi) runner carrying the snakes to the river to activate the rain cycle of nature. [SOM #3 Reverse]

This Society of Medalists Issue #3, in Silver, by Hermon MacNeil is rare.  This silver “Beauty” is the only one I have seen in my ten years of “Searching for Uncle Hermon” and producing this website.

ONLY 25 were made in SILVER (99.9%).

The Silver issue of MacNeil’s medallion is among the rarest of the rare.  

Over sixty-times that number  were struck in  Bronze  (1,713).  Now nearly eight decades later, those are more common, but also rare and collectible.   [See pictured below — at the end of this article — this author’s collection of the varied Bronze patinas of S.O.M #3.]

The next year (1932), Frederick MacMonnies sculpted a medallion celebrating Charles A. Lindbergh historic flight.  250 of those medallions were struck in Silver.  That makes the Lindbergh issue ten times more common than MacNeil’s “Hopi”.  (10 X 25) — 

Silver minting of most SOM Issues quantities usually ranged from 50 to 125.  Most often 100 silver specimens were struck.  SO the 25 of the MACNEIL’S “Prayer for Rain” creations are twice as rare and up to 10 times as rare as other SOM Issues.

This, all Society of Medalists (SOM) in Silver can be considered rare.  However, this MacNeil piece is definitely “THE RAREST OF THE RARE!”

This images that MacNeil’s placed of the Obverse and Reverse had been burned in his visual memory in 1895.  They lived in his artist’s awareness for decades. It is no stretch to say that they inspired numerous sculptures and pieces that came out of his studio. 

“The Moqui Runner,” “The Primitive Chant,” were “living” in his mind when he first saw these scenes. Then, three decades later, he chose them for his own theme and design.  Thus, the 1931 Society of Medalists Issue #3 became his offering to this young series by American Sculptors.

The following are just a few of the sculptures and monuments, which re-capture some of the Native American culture and history first observed in this 1895 trip to the Hopi (Moqui) people.

By comparison, the SOM’s issued from:

  • 1930 to 1944. ~ struck 2X to 5X this quantity of SILVER medallions. 
  • 1945 to 1950. ~ those SOM silver issues were minted in quantities of 50 to 60.
  • 1950 to 1972. ~ NO silver medallions were struck. 
  • 1973 to 1979. ~ Silver medallions ranged from 140-200. 
  • No Silver coins were struck from 1980-1995
  • In 1995 the “Society of Medalists Series” closed production.

In 1931 design the the Society of Medalist medal #3, Hermon MacNeil chose to immortalize his memory of these images from 1895 in rare silver — 99.9% fine silver!

A Rare Beauty Indeed.   Hi Ho, Silver !

MacNeil Display MacNeil Medallion (front and reverse) in Center. Framed by 10 SOM #3 (Obverse & reverse) of varied patinas. SOURCE: Collection of Webmaster

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOURCES:

Information taken from the six page list entitled: Medal Collectors of America; Checklist of “The Society of Medalists” Issues 1930 – Date. Originally written by D. Wayne Johnson with rights retained by him; used with permission.

His listing includes the original pricing supplied by Paul Bosco in the inaugural issue of the MCA’s publication “The Medal Cabinet” (Summer 2000) for the silver issues and Paul’s update values for the bronze pieces that appeared in the Spring/Summer 2002 edition of “The MCA Advisory.”

The MacNeil Studio no longer stands. In it’s nearly fifty years beside the East River Sound, many sculptor assistants, sculptures, and models of works were shaped in that place.

Postcard of MacNeil studio in College Point. From the webmaster’s collection.

This postcard and the Christmas card of 1912, posted on December 22, 2016, show the exterior of the studio. Pictures of the inside of MacNeil’s studio are rare.

However, one word picture offers a captivating account from about 1902-1903.   (Jo Davidson, Between Sittings, Dial Press: New York, 1941).

As an 18 year-old struggling artist, Jo Davidson aspired to become a sculptor. (http://www.highlands-gallery.com/jo-davidson) 

Though young, he was outgoing, naively confident, and very determined. In his autobiography he shares a fascinating encounter with Hermon MacNeil. Davidson gives a vivid description of both of MacNeil’s studios on Fifty-fifth Street and in College Point. Davidson eventually went on to become a renowned portrait sculptor of over 250 world leaders.  See him below sculpting a bust of General Eisenhower nearly fifty years later.  However, his initial impressions upon MacNeil were much less inspiring. Davidson recounts their meeting with understated humor:

Jo Davidson making a bust of General Dwight D. Eisenhower (1948) SOURCE: Laurant Davidson ( http://www.highlands-gallery.com/jo-davidson )

“On my first visit to New York, I went to the Art Students League and inquired who taught the sculpture class. I was told Herman [sic] A. MacNeil. They gave me his address, the Holbein Studios over the stables on West Fifty-fifth Street. I went to call on him to see if I could get a job in his studio. He asked me whether I had ever done any modeling, and remembering Mister Broadman’s encouragement, I told him I had. MacNeil looked at me quizzically and said, ‘I have to go out for a bit.’ He handed me a blueprint, saying, “ See what you can do with this,’ and took me to a stand piled up with plasticine – the beginning of a Corinthian capital. Then Mac Neil left.”

 “I had never seen a blueprint before in my life. I tried to figure it out, but it was hopeless. I looked around the studio. There were bronze statuettes of Indians; scale models of monuments; photographs of executed work; and some portrait heads. I was fascinated and impressed. I made up my mind to get a job with that man.”

 “I struggled with my Corinthian capital but got nowhere. In the midst of this Mr. MacNeil returned. He looked at the sorry mess I had made of his model, shook his head and asked, ‘How much do you expect to earn in a week?’”

 “I meekly suggested fifteen dollars.

He said, ‘Young man, you will never make that at sculpture.’

I asked him what he would give me, taking for granted that a job was there for me. He was taken unawares and said, ‘Six dollars a week.’ I accepted. He looked defeated and said, ‘All right, Come in Monday morning.’”

 “I went home elated and told my people I had found a job in a great sculptor’s studio. Though they did not approve, I think they caught my enthusiasm; I could hardly wait for Monday morning. At the appointed time, I rang the studio bell. The door opened and Mr. MacNeil stuck his head out of the door scowling.

‘I’ve thought it over,’ he said. ‘You are not worth it.’

I followed him into the studio.

‘What am I worth?’ I asked

‘Four dollars.’

‘All right, I’ll take it’

He gave up. ‘All right, you go to my studio in College Point, Long Island and see Mr. [John] Gregory. Tell him you are the new studio boy.’

The ride was long and expensive, a carfare, a ferry and another carfare I arrived at the MacNeil house, which was on the Sound, in Long Island, and finally found Mr. Gregory

Mr. Gregory was rather brusque: ‘Come on, hang up your things,’ he said, and he introduced me to Henri Crenier, the master sculptor.”

Davidson goes on to describe the MacNeil Studio and his early experiences there. His word picture shares some similarities of old Smithsonian archive photos. 

The Poppenhusen Institute houses this plaster model of “A Chief of the Multnomah” donated in 1920 by MacNeil. It represents half of the “Coming of the White Man” grouping comissioned in 1904 for the City of Portland, Oregon by the family of David P. Thompson. (photo courtesy of Bob Walker, College Point)

  

“The studio was a huge barn of a place or, so it appeared to me then. It was full of work in progress. There was the ‘Fountain of Liberty’ which Mr. MacNeil was making for the coming World’s Fair in St. Louis. It consisted of colossal rampant sea-horses, cavorting over a cascade of waves, sea formations and variegated seashells. At the other end of the studio there was an immense group in clay of two Indians – an older Indian standing on his tiptoes with his arms folded across his chest, looking into the distance, the younger Indian with his left hand on the old man’s shoulder and in his right hand waving an olive branch. The title of the group was ‘The Coming of the White Man.’ There were plaster molds and sketches of details of other projects.”

I was bewildered.  John Gregory woke me out of my trance and took me down to the cellar where he was working on some plaster moldings. It didn’t take him long to discover that I knew nothingbut he sensed my eagerness and was quick to give me advise and information. When I got home , I talked everybody’s ear off, but my sister Ray was the only one who listened sympathetically.   She wanted to know all about it and there was so much to tell.” 

STAY TUNED FOR “SO MUCH MORE TO TELL”

SOURCE:  Jo Davidson, Between Sittings: An Informal Autobiography (Dial Press: New York, 1951. Pp.13-16)

 

 

 

 

 

WHAT YOU FIND HERE.

Here is ONE place to go to see sculpture of Hermon A. MacNeil & his students. Located in cities from east to west coast, found indoors and out, public and private, these creations point us toward the history and values that root Americans.

Daniel Neil Leininger ~ HAMacNeil@gmail.com
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WE DESIRE YOUR DIGITAL PHOTOS – Suggestions

1. Take digital photos of the work from all angles, including setting.
2. Take close up photos of details that you like
3. Look for MacNeil’s signature. Photograph it too! See examples above.
4. Please, include a photo of you & others beside the work.
5. Tell your story of adventure. It adds personal interest.
6. Send photos to ~ Webmaster at: HAMacNeil@gmail.com