WELCOME to the “Hermon A. MacNeil” — Virtual Gallery & Museum !

~ This Gallery celebrates Hermon Atkins MacNeil, American sculptor of the Beaux Arts School. MacNeil led a generation of sculptors in capturing many fading Native American images and American history in the realism of this classic style.

~ World’s Fairs, statues, public monuments, coins, and buildings across to country. Hot-links (on the lower right) lead to photos & info of works by MacNeil.

~ Hundreds of stories and photos posted here form this virtual MacNeil Gallery of works all across the U.S.A.  New York to New Mexico — Oregon to South Carolina.

~ 2016 marked the 150th Anniversary of Hermon MacNeil’s birth on February 27,

Take a Virtual Journey

Since 2010 this website has transported viewers through the years and miles between 100’s of Hermon MacNeil’s statues & monuments throughout the USA.

For over one hundred years these sculptures have graced our parks, boulevards, and parkways; buildings, memorials, and gardens; campuses, capitols, and civic centers; museums, coinage, and private collections.

PERHAPS,  you walk or drive by one of his public sculptures daily. HERE, you can gain awareness of this great sculptor and his many works.  Maybe there are some near you! CHECK HERE!

Archive for Friends of Hermon MacNeil

The Hamlin Garland Memorial Highway ~

Brown County, South Dakota

Hamlin Garland https://mypoeticside.com/wp-content/uploads/gallery-images/e6845fc.jpeg 

Hamlin Garland Highway in Brown County South Dakota.
[Credit: Hamlin Garland Society]

 

 

​In June 1936, the Brown County Commissioners named a section of Brown County Highway 11, for a total of 10 miles, the “Hamlin Garland Memorial Highway.” This section travels past the homestead of Garland’s father, Richard, who homesteaded in 1881. In 1998, new signs were placed along this stretch of paved road noting the name of the highway. 

[ Hamlin Garland Society of Aberdeen, SD   http://www.garlandsociety.org/ ]

Hamlin Garland Highway in South Dakota.

GARLAND TOWNSHIP–This township was named after Hamlin Garland, a novelist, who lived in this area with his pioneer parents, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Garland.  The land south and west of Columbia [and Ordway] was immortalized by this writer in “Among the Corn Rows,” and “A Son of the Middle Border.”

SOURCE:  Information courtesy of Gene Aisenbrey ~ Hamlin Garland Society of Aberdeen, SD  Contact: garlandsociety@gmail.com      Copyright © 2015

Garland information on the web:

In 1895 HAMLIN GARLAND led Hermon MacNeil and Francis Brown to the four corners area (AZ, NM, CO, UT) to witness the Native American people and culture there.

  • Hamlin Garland Highway in South Dakota. [SOURCE:  Information courtesy of Gene Aisenbrey ~ Hamlin Garland Society of Aberdeen, SD ~ Contact: garlandsociety@gmail.com  Copyright © 2015 ]
  • Hamlin Garland Biography  (Wisconsin Authors and Their Works)

    • A Biography of three pages
    • One of Garland’s Grant Interviews with Julia Dent Grant (1826-1902) widow of General U. S. Grant
  • SD Historical Society: “Hamlin Garland’s South Dakota: History and Story” https://www.sdhspress.com/journal/south-dakota-history-9-3/hamlin-garlands-dakota-history-and-story/vol-09-no-3-hamlin-garlands-dakota.pdf
  • A brief Garland bio (Al Filreis)

~ A Poem by Hamlin Garland ~

“Do you fear the force of the wind,
The slash of the rain?
Go face them and fight them,
Be savage again.
Go hungry and cold like the wolf,
Go wade like the crane:
The palms of your hands will thicken,
The skin of your cheek will tan,
You’ll grow ragged and weary and swarthy,
But you’ll walk like a man!”

Their  adventure in 1895 led into Native settlements in Colorado, Arizona (Moqui, Navajo), New Mexico, and Utah:

  •  Hamlin Garland, led the tour to the southwest in the summer of 1895. MacNeil & Browne wanted to gain direct experience of American Indians to inform their art. What the trio found reflected in their respective painting, sculpture and writing.
  • MacNeil sculpted a cement statue of Chief Manuelito for trader C. N. Cotton under a tent in the dessert. His subsequent sculptures of Native Americans after that summer of 1895 continued his cultural interest.  That fascination began with his friendship and sculpting of Black Pipe, the Sioux warrior. He first met Black Pipe at the Buffalo Bill Wild West Show at the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893.  The Sioux modeled for MacNeil and later worked in his studio for over a year before MacNeil’s trip with Garland.
  • Charles Francis Browne was a painter and friend (his room mate in Paris) who accompanied Hermon MacNeil and the author.
  • Edward Everett Ayers was an art patron to both MacNeil and Browne.  He had been a Civil War Calvary officer stationed in the southwestern United States.  He became a lumberman who made a fortune selling railroad ties and telephone poles. He urged MacNeil to travel to see the vanishing West of the American Indian.  He became an arts benefactor whose art collections are now housed by the Art Institute of Chicago, as well as, the Newberry Library.    His copy of MacNeil’s “Moqui Runner” still graces the Newberry Library.

Related Posts:

 

In Flushing, New York, The World War Monument by Hermon MacNeil is inscribed:

“In Memory of Those

Who Gave Their Lives”

Roger Bow lives in Bayside, NY.

Last week, his life-long interest in collecting Standing Liberty Quarters, lead him to purchase a MacNeil Medallion.

In his order he added that he grew up in Flushing and always admired the World War Monument there.

I asked him if he would send me some pictures.

WELL, HE DID!

Hi Dan, 

   Received the beautiful Medallion and your nice note. I took some photos this weekend at MacNeil’s War Monument. 
   I grew up appreciating this striking and poignant monument in my hometown. I didn’t fully appreciate it’s magnificence until I was older and had seen and visited other war memorials in other States. Her presence never fails to remind us of the bravery, sacrifice and resolve of our troops while depicting the spiritual comfort of the lost finally coming home. 
   I will take a closer look at the Washington Square Monument next time I am in the area. I never knew MacNeil sculpted that figure as well. Great to make these connections and will always make an effort to visit MacNeil’s works wherever I travel. 
  I appreciate your preserving his legacy and for the gifts that accompanied the medallion. 
   Feel free to use any of the photos attached to my 3 emails.
 
Best regards for a safe and healthy year,
Roger Bow
THANKS, ROGER!
Very Creative.
Take a Bow!

THANKS, ROGER! Roger Bow with his MacNeil Medallion at the Flushing Memorial on Sunday — (8-23-2020)

CLICK ON PHOTOS BELOW FOR A SLIDESHOW:

George Washington statues

Both George Washington statues on the Arch were defaced with red paint in Washington Square.  [Credit: Stefan Jeremiah for New York Post]

We were saddened to hear that “red paint” was splattered over statues of George Washington in NYC yesterday.

CLICK HERE for the New York Post story of the defacing. By Kevin Sheehan and Tina Moore June 29, 2020 | 12:26pm |

George Washington statue

Vandalism on June 29, 2020 left MacNeil’s statue “bleeding” red paint of of the 104 year-old marble monument.

The news arrived this morning from Antonio Bueti, a New York native, MacNeil buff, and Friend of HermonAtkinsMacNeil.com/

Three weeks ago, I posted Photos and the story of BLM Protesters marching through the Arch during demonstrations over the death of George Floyd. CLICK HERE

Both Statues on the Arch were attacked.  Hermon A. MacNeil and Alexander Stirling Calder made the pair of companion pieces that sit on the supporting walls of the Arch at the end of Fifth Avenue. One was “The Soldier” and the other was “The President.”
“We had to work together on those statues, Calder and I,” said Mr. MacNeil, “and we had some hot arguments over them, though we are good friends. Of course, each of us had his own statue to do, but we had to treat them in the same restrained manner, to fit each other and the Arch itself”  J. Walker McSpadden, Famous Sculptors of America: Books for Libraries Press, Freeport, NY, 1924, reprint 1968
MacNeil and Calder had their work placed on the Arch several years after it was constructed.
 
PLEASE NOTE:  Similar vandalism was done on the “Confederate Defenders” in Charleston, SC, [CLICK HERE] after the murders at the Mother Emmanuel AME Church down the street ON JUNE 17, 2015.
Dylan Roof was indited for murder in the Charleston Church Massacre on July 17, 2015.  “In December 2016 he was convicted of 33 federal hate crime and murder charges. On January 10, 2017, he was sentenced to death for these crimes.[9]  https://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/charleston-church-shooting/dylann-roof-indicted-murder-church-massacre-n388066
 
Turbulent times raise issues of removal and/or further vandalism. 
 
We await further updates on this news. …

By The original uploader was TonyTheTiger at English Wikipedia.(Original text: en:User:TonyTheTiger) – Self-photographed, CC BY-SA 3.0,
https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3588095

Carrie as a young girl. Ink drawn portrait by HW Bucknell in 1892 for her parents.

CHRISTMAS DAY

1895

They had a wedding reception in the Marquette Building in the Studio of Hermon Atkins MacNeil.

The Brooks of Winnetka, Illinois hosted the reception for Carol (“Carrie” to her friends) and the “happiest man in the world” – her new husband – “Hermon Atkins MacNeil”. 

Carrie’s father and mother, Alden F. and Ellen T. (nee, Woodworth) Brooks 
lived at 518 Elder Lane, Winnetka. He was a portrait painter for whom President William McKinley once sat.  Hermon would later sculpt the memorial statue of William McKinley at the Columbus, Ohio Capitol Building. McKinley was assassinated in 1901 at the Buffalo Worlds Fair. 

Carrie preferred sculpture to painting, though she grew up in her parents home with a great awareness and appreciation of the arts and Chicago community, and the Chicago Art Institute.

A 2019 photo of the home where Carrie Brooks parents lived when he died at 93 years of age in 1932. The home still stands  at 436 Elder Lane and Woodlawn avenue, in the north shore Chicago suburb of Winnetka, Illinois. The neighborhood appears very original and well maintained even today. They lived elsewhere in Hyde Park when they hosted the wedding reception for Carrie and Hermon 124 years ago.

Happy Christmas Memories

Merry Christmas

and

Happy Anniversary 

( X 124) to the MacNeil Sculptor Couple

our favorite Christmas Coupe Today!

 

Invitation below…

Here is the printed invitation for the Brook’s Christmas Day reception for Carol (Carrie) and Hermon MacNeil at the Marquette Building

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A model of the railroad station built for the Universal Exposition of 1900 in Paris. The building is the present day Musee d’Orsay

The Musee d’Orsay in the center of Paris was originally built as the railroad station for the Universal Exposition of 1900. MacNeil and his contemporary sculptors exhibited and received prizes in that competition.

It now is a Museum.   Sculptures made by MacNeil’s teachers are a part of the exhibits.  MacNeil had many teachers in Paris  at the Ecole Des Beau Arts. Below are the signatures of A [Alexandre] Falguiere and H [Henri] Chapu from two of their marble sculptures.

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Alexandre Falguiere (1831 – 1900)

Falguiere’s sculpture of Tarcisius was completed in 1867 when MacNeil was just 1 year old.

Alexandre Falguiere (1831-1900), Tarcisius, martyr chretien, 1867

Alexandre Falguiere (1831-1900), Tarcisius, martyr chretien, 1867

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Falguiere placed Christian symbols on has interpretation of the young martyr: Two doves of peace, olive branches, alpha and omega, and a cross of the chi-rho letters.

DSCN4132 DSCN4130 DSCN4119

Henri Chapu (1833-1891)

A beautiful feature of Chapu’s work graces the Musee d’Orsay — Joan of Arc (Jeanne d’Arc a’ Domremy 1870.DSCN4110

DSCN4114 DSCN4104

DSCN4113

Jeanne dArc A Domrem by Henri Chapu 1870

Jeanne dArc A Domremy by Henri Chapu 1870

Another art work of Hermon A. MacNeil has emerged through the kindnesses of the Orr family and the attraction of this website  —  namely, a beautiful portrait bust of Hermon MacNeil’s physician, Dr. Francis G. Reilly.

Pat Orr send the information about his MacNeil painting of “Dave Blue” as presented in my previous posting.  He was also kind enough to ask his brother, Tim Orr, to send some photos of another Hermon MacNeil creation that has been in their family (for almost) five generations.  

Pat sent the following request to Tim:

Profile view of plaster bust of Dr. F. G. Reilly created by Hermon Atkins MacNeil.

Profile view of plaster bust of Dr. F. G. Reilly created by Hermon Atkins MacNeil. (photo courtesy and permission of Tim Orr)

Dan has a website dedicated to the life and works of his uncle H.A. MacNeil.  I have the oil painting of Dave Blue Who Lived Under the Ground and you have the bronze bust of Daddy Boy (Grandma’s father, Dr. Francis Reilly). Could you email him some pics.  See his directions below.  He wants to add the discoveries of his uncle’s work to his website and possibly a book as well.

Tim sent several photos of the bust of “Daddy Boy,” as the family has called their heirloom piece. Enhanced profile and frontal views are posted here.

Pat also included some tidbits of family history he gathered in his “MacNeil detective work:’

Bust of F.G. Reilly, MD, FACS was the physician for Hermon A. MacNeil. This bust was a gift to Dr. Reilly by the artist.

Bust of F.G. Reilly, MD, FACS was the physician for Hermon A. MacNeil. This bust was a gift to Dr. Reilly by the artist.

 I have a few more details of interesting information for you.  I spoke with my mother and she said H A MacNeil was a neighbor of my great grandparents in the Catskills. They had a summer house there, and he had one down the road. Apparently, my great grandfather was his doctor. In fact, H A did a bronze bust of my great grandfather which my brother has now at his house.  …

In terms of the home in upstate New York called “Bittersweet” I don’t know what happened to that.  I imagine it was sold at some point along the way.  That was way before my time.  I was born in Washington, D.C. in 1970.

Did you ever meet your uncle, or you just know him by way of photographs?

Tim provided additional interesting family details not mentioned before:

As I understand the story, the bust was compensation to my GG (sic: great-grandfather) for medical services rendered…but that could just be a story. The medallion was either a gift or he may have purchased it, or could have been compensation also.  As an aside, the vacation home in Liberty NY is now under water, a part of a reservoir network in that area I believe.

Tim Orr sent this photo of a SOM#3 medallion at the base o the bust.

Tim Orr sent this photo of a SOM#3 medallion at the base o the bust.

The idea of “compensation” (barter) makes sense in that era and in Hermon MacNeil’s history of doing that with Inn-keepers in his early years of travel in Italy and Paris . 

Thanks to Pat and Tim Orr for sharing heir family history and treasures.  They give us insight into Hermon A. MacNeil and their own family

 

WHAT YOU FIND HERE.

Nearby or far away, there is no ONE place to go and appreciate this wide range of art pieces. Located in cities from east to west coast, found indoors and out, public and hidden, these creations point us toward the history and values in which our lives as Americans have taken root.

Webmaster: Daniel Neil Leininger ~ HAMacNeil@gmail.com
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COME BACK & WATCH US GROW

WE DESIRE YOUR DIGITAL PHOTOS – Suggestions

1. Take digital photos of the entire work from several angles, including the surroundings.
2. Take close up photos of details that capture your imagination.
3. Look for MacNeil’s signature, often on bronze works. Photograph it too! See examples above.
4. Please, include a photo of yourself and/or those with you standing beside the work.
5. Add your comments or a blog of your adventure. It adds personal interest for viewers.
6. Send photos to HAMacNeil@gmail.com Contact me there with any questions. ~~ Webmaster