WELCOME to the “Hermon A. MacNeil” — Virtual Gallery & Museum !

~ This Gallery celebrates Hermon Atkins MacNeil, American sculptor of the Beaux Arts School. MacNeil led a generation of sculptors in capturing many fading Native American images and American history in the realism of this classic style.

~ World’s Fairs, statues, public monuments, coins, and buildings across to country. Hot-links (on the lower right) lead to photos & info of works by MacNeil.

~ Hundreds of stories and photos posted here form this virtual MacNeil Gallery of works all across the U.S.A.  New York to New Mexico — Oregon to South Carolina.

~ 2016 marked the 150th Anniversary of Hermon MacNeil’s birth on February 27,

Take a Virtual Journey

Since 2010 this website has transported viewers through the years and miles between 100’s of Hermon MacNeil’s statues & monuments throughout the USA.

For over one hundred years these sculptures have graced our parks, boulevards, and parkways; buildings, memorials, and gardens; campuses, capitols, and civic centers; museums, coinage, and private collections.

PERHAPS,  you walk or drive by one of his public sculptures daily. HERE, you can gain awareness of this great sculptor and his many works.  Maybe there are some near you! CHECK HERE!

Archive for Location

Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died. 

She was the first Jewish female, AND only

the second woman, ever to be confirmed onto the

US Supreme Court.

– – – – – – –

One year before her birth,

Hermon Atkins MacNeil

sculpted the East Pediment of the

Supreme Court Building

with Moses, the Jewish Lawgiver as its central figure.

“JUSTICE THE GUARDIAN OF LIBERTY”   Hermon A. MacNeil’s sculptures of Moses, Confucius, and Solon on the East Pediment of the Supreme Court Building in Washington, D.C.

Ruth Bader was born while MacNeil created his design.

MacNeil started the East Pediment in 1932.

Ginsburg was born on March 15, 1933

The Pediment with Moses as its center was finished in 1934.

On August 10, 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg took

her Oath as a US Supreme Court Justice

NOW, 27 years later, she has died.

She shaped the LAW

for generations of American Citizens.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Justice Ginsburg

Throughout her lifetime, she was a brilliant servant of gender equality and of minority rights. 

She knew what it was to be discriminated against as a woman, as a mother, and as a lawyer.

She fought gender discrimination whether it affected women or men.

All these obstacles only served to make her a fierce advocate, a potent judge, and a voice to be heard. 

Though diminutive, she became a giant on the court. 

Her opinions were cogent and powerful, whether in the majority or voicing a minority opinion. 

She was also the “first Jewish female” to sit on this supreme bench.

  Moses, Confucius, Solon East Pediment of Supreme Court Building – Washington D.C.

“JUSTICE THE GUARDIAN OF LIBERTY

is the title under MacNeil’s work on the  East Pediment.

MacNeil’s ‘Tortoise’ on the north corner of his east pediment sculpture

MacNeil’s ‘Hare’ on south corner of east Pediment sculpture.

The first and the eleventh figures at either end of MacNeil’s grouping of “Justice the Guardian” are a Hare and a Tortoise  that bring to mind Aesop’s Fable that wisely reminds us that:

“Slow and steady wins the Race.”

It is a moral that RBG took as a legal strategy

MAY JUSTICE CONTINUE TO PREVAIL …

… even if slow and steady …

MacNeil didn’t intend his sculptures to have religious connotations. Explaining his work, MacNeil wrote, “Law as an element of civilization was normally and naturally derived or inherited in this country from former civilizations. The ‘Eastern Pediment’ of the Supreme Court Building suggests therefore the treatment of such fundamental laws and precepts as are derived from the East.”  ( http://architecture.about.com/od/greatbuildings/ss/SupremeCourt_7.htm )

Shocked Mourners gather in honor of the Life of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg moments after her passing

Categories : Location
Comments (0)

In Flushing, New York, The World War Monument by Hermon MacNeil is inscribed:

“In Memory of Those

Who Gave Their Lives”

Roger Bow lives in Bayside, NY.

Last week, his life-long interest in collecting Standing Liberty Quarters, lead him to purchase a MacNeil Medallion.

In his order he added that he grew up in Flushing and always admired the World War Monument there.

I asked him if he would send me some pictures.

WELL, HE DID!

Hi Dan, 

   Received the beautiful Medallion and your nice note. I took some photos this weekend at MacNeil’s War Monument. 
   I grew up appreciating this striking and poignant monument in my hometown. I didn’t fully appreciate it’s magnificence until I was older and had seen and visited other war memorials in other States. Her presence never fails to remind us of the bravery, sacrifice and resolve of our troops while depicting the spiritual comfort of the lost finally coming home. 
   I will take a closer look at the Washington Square Monument next time I am in the area. I never knew MacNeil sculpted that figure as well. Great to make these connections and will always make an effort to visit MacNeil’s works wherever I travel. 
  I appreciate your preserving his legacy and for the gifts that accompanied the medallion. 
   Feel free to use any of the photos attached to my 3 emails.
 
Best regards for a safe and healthy year,
Roger Bow
THANKS, ROGER!
Very Creative.
Take a Bow!

THANKS, ROGER! Roger Bow with his MacNeil Medallion at the Flushing Memorial on Sunday — (8-23-2020)

CLICK ON PHOTOS BELOW FOR A SLIDESHOW:

“Stand As One” members surround “The Confederate Defenders” grouping on their first Sunday rotation at the base of the allegorical grouping designed by Hermon A. MacNeil in 1931. SOURCE: WCIV – Charleston, SC

Two opposing Groups will rotate Weekend Vigils on Sundays at “The Confederate Defenders Monument”

“Black Lives Matter” marchers can now share Sunday Vigil time at the MacNeil statue erected 88 years ago at Battery Point, Charleston, SC.

In recent Months, the figures, sculpted by Hermon MacNeil and dedicated in 1932, have become a modern focal point of tensions in Charleston, SC.  

Since 2015, members of “Flags Across the South” have flown the Confederate flag and stood guard there on Sundays. In recent weekends the opposing group “Stand As One” has asked and received

Now they will have to share rotating weekends with “Stand As One”

Fort Sumter – Start of the Civil War. https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.usflagsupply.com%2Fus-flag-supply-blog%2Ffort-sumter-the-start-of-the-american-civil-war.html&psig=AOvVaw3XRGNv1rn-7lPlHiIn3qbR&ust=1596163275424000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CA0QjhxqFwoTCNDN8dn58-oCFQAAAAAdAAAAABAi

“Black Lives Matter” marchers can now share Sunday Vigil time at the MacNeil statue erected 88 years ago at Battery Point, Charleston, SC.

The Monument at Battery Point overlooks the Charleston Harbor.  Three and a half miles ESE lies Fort Sumter.  The first shots the Civil War were fired there 159 years ago. 

Here is a abcnews4.com article that you might like 7-26-2020

https://abcnews4.com/news/local/two-organizations-will-rotate-weekends-standing-at-confederate-defenders-monument

Justin Hunt said he and his organization, Stand As One, have also requested a permit to stand at the monument several times before.

“This is a public park, so just how they are able to speak and say how they feel, we are able to speak on the same monument and say how we feel,” said Hunt.

RELATED: Unified activist groups against Confederate flag give list of demands for Charleston leaders

Jack O’Toole, spokesperson for the Mayor’s office, explained that both groups had applied for the same permit, asking to protest one the same days at the same time for the “foreseeable future,” which the Charleston Police Department had never experienced before.

So CPD officials reached out to the legal department and found a compromise.

“What (the Legal Department) decided was that it made sense to protect everyone’s rights by having everyone trade back and forth one weekend and the next,” O’Toole said. “Last weekend, the flag supporters were at the monument and the counter-protesters were at high battery. This weekend, the counter-protester at monument, flag supporters at high battery.”

For Spivey and Flags Across the South, being at the high wall is nothing new to them.

“We used to stand up here on the high wall when we first started doing this,” said Spivey.

For Stand As One, they’ll continue to advocate for more.

“We call the City Mayor and Council to stop spending money in over policing and focus on ensuring the police and property policing. We do hope our presence here will not be needed long,” said Hunt.

Categories : Location
Comments (0)

A man was arrested in Charleston, SC, at The Confederate Defenders statue today as a woman was video recording. “For the past couple Sundays, supporters of Black Lives Matter and supporters of the Confederacy, a group called Flags Across America, have stood at the Battery near the Confederate Defenders statue to protest.”

ABC News 4 & WCIV report Charleston police stating that “a man was arrested after he allegedly “chest-bumped” a woman near the Confederate Defenders statue.

Witnesses tell ABC News 4 that a man shoved a Black Lives Matter protester. Charleston Police officials said they don’t have information on which group he was supporting.

Seven weeks ago on May 30th, the base of this statue was marked with red spray paint. Incidents have continued since then.

Since the murders at the AME Mother Emmanuel Church in 2015, The Confederate Defenders have been spray painted at least 3 times.

No one has been was injured in any of these incidents since 2015.

CLICK HERE: FOR VIDEO and further details OF THE ARREST.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

OTHER VANDALISM ELSEWHERE on MacNeil works:

In New York City the MacNeil statue of George Washington as General of the Continental Army has also been spray painted. CLICK HERE

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Related posts:

 

 

FRIEZE

RECENT Posts here at on https://hermonatkinsmacneil.com/ have reported demonstrations staged around The Confederate Defenders Sculpture at Battery Point in Charleston, SC. 
 
That Monument was commissioned around 1930 to focus on Fort Sumter out in the Harbor. he following editorial appeared in FRIEZE three years ago.  The Opinion raises an important distinction, namely, Historical Fact versus Collective Memory.
 
 
[Julian Chambliss is Professor of English and History at Michigan State University (MSU), in East Lansing, MI.]
23 Aug 2017

Public debate around Confederate insignia has little to do with historical fact, and everything to do with collective memory.

What we see happening in places like Charlottesville today – after the tragic, bloody events of last weekend, and the roiling debates around Confederate monuments – has less to do with historical fact and more to do with collective memory. In Dell Upton’s 2015 book What Can and Can’t Be Said – his insightful examination of African-American memorials in the United States – we are presented with two pivotal questions regarding our understanding of monuments in the contemporary South: what is possible and what is permitted to be said in debates around public memorials?

Upton’s analysis of civil rights memorials acknowledges a key point too often omitted from contemporary debates. New South ‘boosterism’ invented the memorial landscape in the 1880s and 1890s. A class of merchants, manufacturers and financiers sought to transform the south. Partnering with figures such as Henry W. Grady (1850-89), the managing editor of the Atlanta Constitution, they promoted industrial growth, agrarian reform, and northern investment to reintegrate the region into the ‘political and economic life’ of the United States. This process required the stripping away of facts around the political, economic, and social motivations involved in fighting the Civil War, and in its place, a new context that embraced a collective understanding of southern sentiment about the war that would be acceptable to northern whites. This process had nothing to do with the history of the war. Americans, north and south, knew full well that the Confederacy was created to preserve slavery, and the resolution of the Civil War meant the end of a slave democracy on which southerners relied. 

Detail from H.A. MacNeil’s Confederate Defenders of Charlestone monument (1932). Courtesy: Mr.TinDC, Flickr, Creative Commons

Detail from H.A. MacNeil’s Confederate Defenders of Charleston monument, 1932, Charleston, South Carolina. Courtesy: Mr.TinDC, Flickr, Creative Commons

In other words, today we are not debating what happened, but instead we are quarrelling about how southerners choose to remember it. As countless historians have tirelessly explained, the Confederate memorials that dot the landscape were erected long after the war was fought as southerners promoted the idea of a ‘New South.’ New, in the sense that a new generation of southern leaders embraced a narrative of modernization and preservation: a narrative that argued that southerners fought nobly not to preserve slavery, but for self-determination against northern aggression. This story meant that, fuelled by a regional identity that believed in honour, family, and religion, southerners may have lost on the battlefield, but they would retain the values that defined their culture. They continued to preserve those noble values even as they grew cities and nurtured industries such as textiles and railroads.

They succeeded in reshaping and rebranding the region, but it came at a high cost for black Americans. As southern whites murdered and disenfranchised black people, they would celebrate why they committed those acts by creating markers to an idealized version of white southern history. The memorials we debate today are public markers created by private groups that endorse this white vision and support these white actions. In truth, we should not call them memorials. A proper label would be ‘political markers funded by the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) and gifted to municipalities across the South to celebrate the re-establishment of white rule after Reconstruction’.  

The pattern of greatest activism linked to these markers between 1896 and 1919 and again between 1954 and 1965 correlates to the public proclamations of anti-black sentiment at those moments. Indeed, the first period coincides with the rise of white supremacy marked by the 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson decision that legalized segregation and opened the door to subsequent black voter suppression, a lynching campaign in the 1890s and a series of anti-black riots in communities such as Atlanta (1906), Springfield (1908), and East St. Louis (1917). This aggression culminated in 1919 with what author James Weldon Johnson described as the ‘The Red Summer’: a series of 26 race-inspired riots that erupted across the United States. The second period marked white southerners reacting against the landmark Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision in 1954 that ended school segregation. In the years that followed that victory – as Martin Luther King and countless others marched in nonviolent protest culminating in the Civil Rights Act (1964) which outlawed discrimination based on race, colour, religion, sex, or national origin and the Voting Rights Act (1965) which prevented denial or restriction of the right to vote – southerners embraced symbols of the Confederacy.

Navigating the space created between history and feeling prompted me to participate in The Confederate Flag – 13 Flag Funerals organized by artist John Sims on 25 May 2015. In organizing the burning and burials of the Confederate Flag in the former states of the Confederacy on the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War, Sims commemorated the struggle for freedom from an African-American perspective. A form of creative resistance, the project highlighted what countless black and white people were prevented from saying for decades. A black person burning a symbol of the Confederacy in public rejects the romanticized South and challenges the white-centric public memory that defines the region. Online threats, calls to my college for me to be fired and calls for me to be arrested for burning the Confederate flag, bombarded me as I pursued this project. Yet, in confronting Confederate symbolism with a public art project, we foreshadowed a wider debate around truth in the public sphere. It reminded Americans that black people who challenged white supremacy have been terrorized, beaten, or killed for doing so. It acknowledged, as should be obvious, that African Americans rejoiced in the South’s defeat, suffered brutally through Jim Crow segregation and continue today to seek freedom equal to all in the public square.

While previous ethnic white immigrants that came to United States were placed in a ‘melting pot’ that washed away their difference and made them ‘white’, our contemporary social space cannot be defined by that white racial status quo. The lived experience that defines the modern United States requires the legacies and memories of all our people to inform the public square we inhabit. While it may seem like an empowered white majority clinging to the past defines our current reality, in truth, today many more Americans are claiming a place for their experiences to define our democracy. Together we care about the truth and reject symbols that threaten and demean; we seek a community that celebrates the richness of our diversity. But we must work hard to confront the truth of historical violence and its effect. With that truth made clear, we can move towards a public sphere that celebrates the people and institutions that helped the United States live up to its ideals. 

Main image: detail from Moses Jacob Ezekiel’s Confederate monument (1914) at Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia. Courtesy: Mark Fischer, Flickr, Creative Commons

 

Julian Chambliss is Professor of English and History at Michigan State University (MSU), in East Lansing, MI.

Sunday (July 12, 2020) saw continued protest at the Confederate Defenders Monument.

WCSC (Live5News.com) [CLICK HERE] offered a photo and coverage.

Two opposed groups gathered. Black Lives Matter marchers held their signs along The Battery wall. Across the street at the Confederate Defenders Monument, members of Flags Across the South as Police stood watch.

Black Lives Matter protesters the hold signs along the Battery Wall, while “Flags Across the South” people hold Confederate flags at the monument across the street.

BLACK LIVES MATTER:

Abbey O’Brien reported for WCSC Live5News.com that two groups gathered at the Confederate Defenders statue at Battery Point Charleston on Sunday morning. (Source: Live 5)

The BLM marchers carried signs that included:

  • “Stop Pretending Your Racism Is Patriotism;”
  • “HONK Against RACISM”
  • “MAKE RACISM WRONG AGAIN”
  • “THIS IS NOT JUST ABOUT ONE MAN”
  • “BLACK LIVES MATTER”

FLAGS ACROSS THE SOUTH:

Braxton Spivey, from Flags Across the South, told WCSC that he has stood at the statue nearly every Sunday for five years.  He explains his presence there:

“My agenda, from the first time I’ve come up here, was to educate,” Spivey said. “I disagreed with the flag coming down from behind the soldier’s monument at the Statehouse. I feel like that was an appropriate place for it.”

“My agenda, from the first time I’ve come up here, was to educate,” Spivey said. “I disagreed with the flag coming down from behind the soldier’s monument at the Statehouse. I feel like that was an appropriate place for it.”

Mika Gadsden, speaking for those standing across the street on The Battery wall, state:

“We stand in opposition to these white supremacists tributes, we want them down in this city,”  while s“We want the City of Charleston to recognize its history and honor its history with more accurate historical representations.”

“This needs to be the beginning of a more substantive conversation. We need to heighten the level of discourse around this Civil War iconography. We need to use this moment to bring about real substantive change. I don’t want the streets painted with Black Lives Matter, I want Black Lives Matter to be reflected in city policy. I want to see equity and I want to see the city take a firm stand against white supremacists iconography.”

Abbey O’Brien concludes her reporting: “While there was shouting, no other violence has been reported so far.”

For the record:

When a Succession Gala was organized and held in Charleston in 2010, this webmaster posted the following story:
MacNeil Statue will not attend Secession Gala

Perhaps, it warrants reading again.

MacNeil Statue will not attend

Secession Gala

By

[For more recent news (Dec 21st, 2010) on the posting below see this link:  The Star: Ball Draws Celebrators, Protestors ]

 Hermon A. MacNeil’s Confederate Defenders statue may cast its shadow on upcoming Secession Gala festivities.  MacNeil’s massive work stands sentry over Charleston Harbor, facing toward Ft Sumter, 3 1/2 miles away.

MacNeil’s “Confederate Defenders” as photographed in his studio in 1931.

 

The South Carolina Theatrical Performance and Secession Ball is planned for December 20th at Gaillard Auditorium in downtown Charleston, SC.  Tickets are still available for $100 each at the Gala Website
Dress Code consists of: “Modern black tie, Period formal, or pre-war militia. Ladies formal modern or period.”
 
According to the sponsoring committee:

The South Carolina Secession Gala tickets are going quickly. We have less than one month left to attend an event that will surely be an “EVENT OF A LIFETIME”!!! You certainly won’t want to miss this wonderful event!We have a 45 minute theatrical play re-enacting the signing of the original Ordinance of Secession with Senators and famous individuals as actors in this performance. We even have President Pro-Tempore of the SC Senate, Glenn F. McConnell as Convention Chair, David F. Jamison of Barnwell.

The wonderful news is that the ORIGINAL Ordinance of Secession will be available for viewing by our guests. This is not a lithograph, but the ACTUAL document which has been protected for years in the vault and hasn’t been seen in years. Those sponsoring tables will be able to have a group photograph with all Sponsors made with the ORIGINAL ORDINANCE.

The cost includes the theatrical play, dinner and dancing. Do not wait until the last minute as tickets are going fast and there is limited seating.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The event has stirred some debate in the news locally and nationally. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-12-10/civil-war-s-150th-anniversary-stirs-debate-on-race.html

“It’s almost like celebrating the Holocaust,” said Benard Simelton, president of the Alabama conference of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. “Our rights were taken away and we were treated as less than human beings. To relive that in a celebratory way I don’t think is right.”

For persons not wanting to pay $100, there are other alternatives.   The state’s NAACP chapter plans a protest march and vigil outside the city-owned auditorium where the party will be held.

CLOSING COMMENT: The MacNeil Statue will not attend the Gala. It will remain in Battery Park, its home for the last 78 years.  In addition, the sculpture’s attire is not proper for the dress code of the Ball. WEBMASTER

Related MacNeil Links:

https://hermonatkinsmacneil.com/2010/08/10/confederate-defenders-of-charleston/

https://hermonatkinsmacneil.com/2010/08/04/confederate-defenders-statue-battery-park/

 

 

 

https://www.live5news.com/2020/07/12/black-lives-matter-activists-protest-confederate-monument-downtown-charleston/

Comments (0)

WHAT YOU FIND HERE.

Nearby or far away, there is no ONE place to go and appreciate this wide range of art pieces. Located in cities from east to west coast, found indoors and out, public and hidden, these creations point us toward the history and values in which our lives as Americans have taken root.

Webmaster: Daniel Neil Leininger ~ HAMacNeil@gmail.com
Hosting & Tech Support: Leiturgia Communications, Inc.
COME BACK & WATCH US GROW

WE DESIRE YOUR DIGITAL PHOTOS – Suggestions

1. Take digital photos of the entire work from several angles, including the surroundings.
2. Take close up photos of details that capture your imagination.
3. Look for MacNeil’s signature, often on bronze works. Photograph it too! See examples above.
4. Please, include a photo of yourself and/or those with you standing beside the work.
5. Add your comments or a blog of your adventure. It adds personal interest for viewers.
6. Send photos to HAMacNeil@gmail.com Contact me there with any questions. ~~ Webmaster