WELCOME to the “Hermon A. MacNeil” — Virtual Gallery & Museum !

~ This Gallery celebrates Hermon Atkins MacNeil, American sculptor of the Beaux Arts School. MacNeil led a generation of sculptors in capturing many fading Native American images and American history in the realism of this classic style.

~ World’s Fairs, statues, public monuments, coins, and buildings across to country. Hot-links (on the lower right) lead to photos & info of works by MacNeil.

~ Hundreds of stories and photos posted here form this virtual MacNeil Gallery of works all across the U.S.A.  New York to New Mexico — Oregon to South Carolina.

~ 2016 marked the 150th Anniversary of Hermon MacNeil’s birth on February 27,

Take a Virtual Journey

This website seeks to transport you through miles and years with a few quick clicks of a mouse or keyboard or finger swipes on an iPad.

Perhaps you walk or drive by one of MacNeil's many sculptures daily. Here you can gain awareness of this artist and his works.

For over one hundred years his sculptures have graced our parks, boulevards, and parkways; buildings, memorials, and gardens; campuses, capitols, and civic centers; museums, coinage, and private collections.

Maybe there are some near you!

Archive for Hartford

Two MacNeil Statues on Connecticut Capitol were previously presented in a posting on May 7, 2011: “General Alfred Howe Terry” and “Major General John Sedgwick”

Connecticutt State Capitol in Hartford is home of 7 MacNeil sculptures.

Connecticut Capitol Bldg. – Hartford Connecticut

Presented here are the following pieces:

  • 1917 Capitol Building, Hartford Conn., full length statues of:
    • Colonel David Humphreys,
    • Judge Oliver Ellsworth,
    • General David Wooster,
    • Governor Oliver Wolcott, and
    • Gideon Welles.
  • Location: Connecticut State Capitol west elevation.

The west elevation of the Connecticut State Capitol honors significant historical figures of 18th-century Connecticut. Three of the four statues on this elevation honor veterans of the Revolutionary War.

In 1915 the state Commission on Sculpture selected the four statues to be installed on the west elevation of the capitol. All were sculpted by Hermon MacNeil.

More of MacNeil’s work can be seen in statues and medallions on the north and south sides of the capitol. He is best known for his design of the Liberty Quarter Dollar (1916).

Governor Oliver Wolcott statue.

  • Artist: Hermon MacNeil. Installed c. 1917. Picture not available.

  • Oliver Wolcott (1726-1797), one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, was born in Litchfield, Connecticut. He commanded fourteen regiments of Connecticut militia sent to the defense of New York in the Revolutionary War. In 1796 he was chosen governor of Connecticut.
  • Biographical information on Wolcott can be found at Wikipedia

David Humphreys statue.

  • Location: Connecticut State Capitol west elevation. Artist: Hermon MacNeil.
David Humphreys Statue on the Connecticutt Capitol
  • David Humphreys (1752-1818) was born in Derby, Connecticut, educated at Yale, and became known as one of a group of poets and writers known as the “Hartford Wits.” In 1788, he wrote, Essay on the Life of the Honorable Major-General Israel Putnam.
  • During the Revolutionary War, Humphreys served as secretary-aide to General Washington, and is said to have been responsible for enlisting the first African-Americans in American armed forces. His heroic actions at the Battle of Yorktown earned him a presentation sword from Congress. He ended the War as a Lieutenant-Colonel, and served with the rank of Brigadier General in the War of 1812.

Humphreys’ statue was commissioned along with those of Oliver Wolcott, David Wooster, and Oliver Ellsworth by the state Commission on Sculpture in 1915, and  dedicated about 1921.

[“David Humphreys.” Dictionary of American Biography Base Set. American Council of Learned Societies, 1928-1936. Reproduced in Biography Resource Center. Farmington Hills, Mich.: Gale, 2009.]

[ http://galenet.galegroup.com/servlet/BioRC (accessed via iConn March 23, 2009).]

(Putnam’s statue by J. Q. A. Ward can be seen in Bushnell Park).

 

 

Judge  Oliver Ellsworth statue

Judge Oliver Ellsworth Statue on Connecticutt Capitol

  • Judge  Oliver Ellsworth (1745–1807) , American political leader, third Chief Justice of the United States (1796–1800), b. Windsor, Conn.  A Hartford lawyer, he was (1778–83) a member of the Continental Congress during the American Revolution. His great service was at the U.S. Constitutional Convention, where he and Roger Sherman advanced the “Connecticut compromise,” ending the struggle between large and small states over representation. He also served on the five-member committee that prepared the first draft of the Constitution, and was responsible for the use of the term “United States” in the document.
  • In Connecticut, he played (1788) an important role in the state ratifying convention. As U.S. senator (1789–96), he was a leader of the Federalists and largely drafted the bill that set up the federal judiciary and gave the U.S. Supreme Court the authority to review state supreme court decisions. Ellsworth later served (1799–1800) as a commissioner to negotiate with the French government concerning the restrictions put on American vessels. See biography by W. G. Brown (1905). The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2007, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

Read more: Oliver Ellsworth — Infoplease.com http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/people/A0817167.html#ixzz1HfJgbLs1

also: http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/constitution_founding_fathers_connecticut.html

David Wooster statue

General David Wooster statue on Connecticut State Capitol (west elevation).

  • 1924 General David Wooster statue. Another work of artist Hermon MacNeil, this sculpture rests on the west elevation of the Connecticut State Capitol.

Historical Background: General David Wooster (1711-1777) was born in Stratford, Connecticut, and served in the French and Indian Wars before commanding troops in the Revolutionary War. He is credited with masterminding the plan to capture Fort Ticonderoga in 1775, carried out by Ethan Allen and Aaron Burr. In 1776 he was put in command of the American troops at Quebec. After resigning from the Continental Army, Wooster served in command of the Connecticut militia. He was killed pursuing General Tryon’s retreating forces following Tryon’s attack on Danbury in 1777.

The Wooster statue was commissioned by the state Commission on Sculpture in 1915. Completion of the this and the Humphreys statue was delayed until more funds were approved in 1921.

The artist, Hermon MacNeil, is best known for his design for the Liberty quarter dollar (1916). His naturalistic style, with high modeling and surface texture, reflects his Parisian training at L’Ecole des Beaux-Arts. His works are included in public collections such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

 

General Israel Putnam

  • General Israel Putnam (not pictured) – On the south elevation of the Conn. State Capitol he is depicted leaving his farm plow to answer the Lexington Alarm (1775) in a relief sculpture by artist Hermon MacNeil. General Putnam, a Connecticut native, served with distinction in theRevolutionary War. He is the originator of the famous phrase, “Don’t one of you fire until you see the white [sic] of their eyes” at the Battle of Bunker Hill near Boston(where he led Connecticut troops; 1775).
  • A statue of Putnam (by Artist: John QuincyAdams Ward [1830-1910]) can be seen in Bushnell Park– It is bronze metal on a granite base completed by Ward in 1873 (when MacNeil was only 7 years old.)  http://www.ct.gov/mil/cwp/view.asp?a=1351&q=258410).
  • For more on Putnam: “Don’t one of you fire until you see the white of their eyes”

Gideon Welles statue.

1934 Gideon Welles statue on Connecticut State Capitol (south elevation).

  • 1934 Gideon Welles statue. Location: Connecticut State Capitol south elevation.
  • Artist: Hermon MacNeil.
  • Installed c. 1934 0n The south elevation of the Connecticut State Capitol represents the Civil War era as well as Ella Grasso’s governorship. Gideon Welles (1802-1878) was Secretary of the Navy under Presidents Lincoln and Johnson, as well as editor of The Hartford Times. His statue occupies one of six niches on the south elevation of the projecting pavilion, alongside the statues of General John Sedgwick and Alfred Howe Terry (see previous posts).

The statue was commissioned under the supervision of the state Commission on Sculpture and was installed about 1934. A cleaning and restoration project of the exterior of the capitol, including the Welles statue, was completed in 1985.

The artist, Hermon MacNeil, is best known for his design for the Liberty quarter dollar (1916). His naturalistic style, with high modeling and surface texture, reflects his Parisian training at L’Ecole des Beaux-Arts. His works are included in public collections such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

 

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WHAT YOU FIND HERE.

Nearby or far away, there is no ONE place to go and appreciate this wide range of art pieces. Located in cities from east to west coast, found indoors and out, public and hidden, these creations point us toward the history and values in which our lives as Americans have taken root.

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