WELCOME to the “Hermon A. MacNeil” — Virtual Gallery & Museum !

~ This Gallery celebrates Hermon Atkins MacNeil, American sculptor of the Beaux Arts School. MacNeil led a generation of sculptors in capturing many fading Native American images and American history in the realism of this classic style.

~ World’s Fairs, statues, public monuments, coins, and buildings across to country. Hot-links (on the lower right) lead to photos & info of works by MacNeil.

~ Hundreds of stories and photos posted here form this virtual MacNeil Gallery of works all across the U.S.A.  New York to New Mexico — Oregon to South Carolina.

~ 2016 marked the 150th Anniversary of Hermon MacNeil’s birth on February 27,

Take a Virtual Journey

This website seeks to transport you through miles and years with a few quick clicks of a mouse or keyboard or finger swipes on an iPad.

Perhaps you walk or drive by one of MacNeil's many sculptures daily. Here you can gain awareness of this artist and his works.

For over one hundred years his sculptures have graced our parks, boulevards, and parkways; buildings, memorials, and gardens; campuses, capitols, and civic centers; museums, coinage, and private collections.

Maybe there are some near you!

Archive for Philadelphia

“They’re Still There!”

That’s the 2020 theme for the tenth year of MacNeil Month. 

We observe each February as MacNeil Month here on HAM.

“They’re Still There!” celebrates several re-visits and discoveries of MacNeil works made in 2019. This years featured visits include:

  1. “The Sun Vow” in New York City and Monmouth, New Jersey. 
  2. “William McKinley” statue in Columbus, Ohio.
  3. Presidents Day – Lincoln and Washington
  4. The Patten Gym at Northwestern University ~ “Intellectual Development” and “Emotional Development”
  5. “The Soldiers and Sailors Monument” in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Why do this in February?  Two reasons:

  1. February 27 is the anniversary of the birth of Hermon A. MacNeil, born in 1866, of one-hundred and fifty-four years ago. Hermon is the patron-sculptor whose work and life are celebrated at this website – HermonAtkinsMacNeil.com.
  2. February 29 is the Anniversary of the birth of Thomas (Tom) Henry McNeil (my grandfather) born in 1860, one-hundred and sixty years ago. Tom told his daughters to address “Hermon” as “Uncle Hermon.”  “Uncle” was the title of respect bestowed on their first-cousin-twice-removed.

Nice Packard! Nice Monument. 

We have purchased a rare period photograph of a historic Packard automobile which includes some of MacNeil’s public work in Philadelphia.  This monument was introduced earlier on this site.  [CLICK HERE]. (The Packard was not.)

The exact Packard model pictured here will be identified later. It appears to be from the 1928-1933 era. (Probably a  1929 Model 640 RunaboutSixth Series)[Actually a 1930 model – dnl]. 

In 1927 Hermon A. MacNeil sculpted the Philadelphia Soldiers and Sailors Monument that graces the Ben Franklin Parkway.

The Parkway way design was inspired by the Champs-Élysées in Paris, France with its Arc De Triomphe.  It commemorated many centuries of French military victories.

Philadelphia chose two grand pylons 60 feet tall rather than an Arch. It was to be Philadelphia’s version of a “grand avenue of heroes” leading out to the Philadelphia Art Museum. 

On these limestone pylons, Hermon A. MacNeil carved two Civil War monuments: one to the Soldiers and the second to the Sailor’s of the Civil War. After sixty (60) years, only a few of those who fought were still alive in 1927. This Monument was a tribute to their sacrifice and the “One Union” for which they fought. 

Philadelphia’s pride in that history is attributed in the following video celebration.

The Soldiers side of the monument is pictured more often than this Sailor’s side view.

Webmaster, Dan Leininger is a Packard owner and fanatic who possesses a less rare Packard. An older restoration of a 1941 Packard Clipper, the first of the Clipper line.

"Clipper Jack!" Dan's 1941 Packard Clipper as it appears 78 years after rolling out of the Detroit Packard Plant. later

“Clipper Jack!” Dan’s 1941 Packard Clipper as it appears 78 years after rolling out of the Detroit Packard Plant. Click  HERE for my “Hillbilly Packard Brothers” project blog on Packard Info.com 

 

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 ONE COUNTRY,   ONE CONSTITUTION,   ONE DESTINY

words from the Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Monument in Philadelphia

“IN GIVING FREEDOM TO THE SLAVE

WE ASSURE FREEDOM TO THE FREE”.  Abraham Lincoln

CLICK HERE for interpretive video

Early postcard (about 1927) shows the back of MacNeil's "Soldiers and Sailors" Monument looking east to the downtown. (Photo credit Gib Shell, KC,MO)

The Soldiers and Sailors Monument in Philadelphia By Hermon A. MacNeil was dedicated in 1927. Two 60 foot granite pylons mark the entrance to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The period automobiles and newly planted trees line the Parkway. This beautiful boulevard leads from Logan Circle through the rolling Parkway Gardens on up the hill to the Philadelphia Art Museums.

Hermon A. MacNeil's “Soldiers and Sailors Monuments” mark the entrance to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphia

Link

 

Hermon Atkins MacNeil, American Sculptor (1866-1947)

Click ‘MUSEUM …’ below – then PLAY


MUSEUM WITHOUT WALLS™: AUDIO –

“Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Memorial”

[from Fairmount Park Art Association on Vimeo.]

“ONE COUNTRY, ONE CONSTITUTION, ONE DESTINY”

 

This Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Monument was dedicated in 1927.  The Monument consists of two 60 foot granite pylons.  These pillars mark the entrance to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway.  This beautiful boulevard leads from Logan Circle through the rolling Parkway Gardens on up the hill to the Philadelphia Art Museums.

  • Find the Soldiers panel and Civil War history  HERE.
  • The Soldiers pylon is pictured below =>

The Soldiers side of the monument

  • For DIRECTIONS to this Monument see the Google Map below.

We hope to have our own photos to post at a future date.

Meanwhile, thanks to the citizens and public officials of Philly for this tribute to American history and the work of Hermon Atkins MacNeil.

 

Happy Birthday Rachel!

 

 

 

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WHAT YOU FIND HERE.

Nearby or far away, there is no ONE place to go and appreciate this wide range of art pieces. Located in cities from east to west coast, found indoors and out, public and hidden, these creations point us toward the history and values in which our lives as Americans have taken root.

Webmaster: Daniel Neil Leininger ~ HAMacNeil@gmail.com
Hosting & Tech Support: Leiturgia Communications, Inc.
COME BACK & WATCH US GROW

WE DESIRE YOUR DIGITAL PHOTOS – Suggestions

1. Take digital photos of the entire work from several angles, including the surroundings.
2. Take close up photos of details that capture your imagination.
3. Look for MacNeil’s signature, often on bronze works. Photograph it too! See examples above.
4. Please, include a photo of yourself and/or those with you standing beside the work.
5. Add your comments or a blog of your adventure. It adds personal interest for viewers.
6. Send photos to HAMacNeil@gmail.com Contact me there with any questions. ~~ Webmaster