WELCOME to the “Hermon A. MacNeil” — Virtual Gallery & Museum !

~ This Gallery celebrates my great Uncle, Hermon Atkins MacNeil an American classic sculptor of the Beaux Arts School.  He sculpted Native images and American history:  ~ World’s Fairs, statues, monuments, coins, and more…  ~ Over 300 stories (25 per page) in 10 pages. (Click on Next Page >> at bottom).  View thousands of photos from this virtual MacNeil Gallery.  It stretches from New York to New Mexico ~ Oregon to S. Carolina.   ~ 2016 marked the 150th Anniversary of Hermon MacNeil’s birth. ~ Hot-links ( lower right) lead to works by Hermon Atkins MacNeil.  ~~Do you WALK or DRIVE by MacNeil sculptures DAILY!  ~ CHECK OUT my Uncle Hermon’s works here!

Daniel Neil Leininger, webmaster

DO YOU walk by MacNeil Statues and NOT KNOW IT ???

Archive for Sculptures

 

While July 4th marks

the 248th Independence Day of the

United States,

we have seen turbulent times

BEFORE in our history…

~~~~

  * Today is Wednesday, July 3.  On this day in:

H.A. MacNeil’s General George Washington with Flags (U.S. and POW/MIA) ~ Washington Arch Greenwich, NYC (Photo courtesy of: Gibson Shell – 2011)

1775: George Washington assumed command of Continental Army in Cambridge, Mass.

1778: American Revolutionary War ~ 360 settlers were killed by British loyalists and Iroquois warriors in Wyoming Valley of Pennsylvania. The attack was part of the British campaign to disrupt frontier settlements.

1856: The U.S. House of Representatives voted on the Topeka Constitution, which was a resolution to admit Kansas to statehood as an antislavery territory. The vote faced immense opposition from the existing pro-slavery territorial government and the U.S. Senate.

** Source below NY Daily News

1863: The Battle of Gettysburg ended as Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee tried to break the Union line with several attacks, including the disastrous last-ditch effort known as ‘Pickett’s Charge.’ Over 7,000 Confederate soldiers were captured or killed within an hour of that charge. Lee retreated a day later. The Battle of Gettysburg was considered the turning point in the American Civil War.

1884: Dow Jones & Co., the world’s first stock index, launched as  published its first stock average. The index was composed of nine railroads and two industrial companies.

1890: Idaho was admitted to the Union as the 43rd state. President Abraham Lincoln originally established  Idaho territory in 1863 after thousands of prospective miners settled in the area during the Gold Rush.

 

SO …

May GOD continue to bless the

United States of America

even in our TURBULENT Times

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

* Source:  Hoang Tran, USA TODAY Network

** PHOTO of MacNeil’s Confederate Defenders: NY Daily News — http://www.nydailynews.com/news/crime/statue-honoring-confederacy-defaced-charleston-park-article-1.2266043

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Categories : Location, Monuments, Statue
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The “Pony Express” statue in St. Joseph, Missouri  was dedicated in 1940.

Hermon MacNeil turned 74 that February 27th. He posed for newspaper photos sitting on the statue base.

The statue appears to be un-mounted on its massive pedestal base. 

  • Was this photo taken at the foundry before shipping? 
  • Or maybe at St. Joe before being erected on the pedestal base? 
  • WE don’t know!
  • BUT the sculptor seems proud and relaxed aside his historic tribute! 

The authentic saddle & mail bags were consistent with Dr. S. M. Strong’s  replicas which were Hermon patterns.  And of course , “Poncho Villa”, the Doctor’s rescued rodeo mustang. after.

Twenty years later (1960), was the Centennial of the first Pony Express ride.  That year the  US Post Office issued a Commemorative 4 Cent stamp, as pictured below:    

  • Because the PONY EXPRESS became an established ICON and growing legend. 
  • St. Jo, MO took the iconic “horse and rider” as a SYMBOL for the city itself. 
  • They have continued that identity to the present day, though 164 years have passed. 

RIDE ON, O’ symbol of American history.  Your sculptor has brought you to life at your starting gate of iconic legend. 

FOR MORE:  Go to STJOMO.com

 

Related posts:

  1. Pony Express Rides Again! (26.1) In the heart of downtown Saint Joseph, Missouri the “Pony…
  2. Pony Express Hood Ornament (19) On a rainy day recently I visited MacNeil’s Pony Express…
  3. Attention to Detail ~ “The Pony Express” ~ by H. A. MacNeil (17.9) On first viewing, the sculptures of Hermon MacNeil express amazing…

 

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2024

By William Henry Jackson – SOURCE: https://www.loc.gov/resource/g4051p.tr000013/, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10111804

ThePony Express ran for only 18 months, but has become an

“AMERICAN ICON.”

 

Hermon MacNeil’s “Pony Express”

is ALSO  an ICON

marking Saint Joseph, Missouri, as “Station One.”

on the 1900 mile route of 190 Stations

stretching to Sacramento, California.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

<=<= <= AAA World

<=<=travel  magazine.

This summer features a Missouri State Travel Ad with Hermon’s Statue of “Pancho Villa” the outlaw Dakota Mustang of Bill Cody’s Wild West Rodeo! 

AND LAMBERT’s  (home of  ‘Throwed Rolls’) in Branson, Missouri a special place to eat

… and catch ‘throwed’ Rolls (click here)

MORE Pony Express NEXT TIME …

PLUS + PREVIOUS Pony Express BELOW ⇓

Hermon MacNeil’s “Pony Express” or “Pancho Villa” Rides Again!

m

Attention to Detail ~ “The Pony Express” ~ by H. A. MacNeil

Related posts:

  1. Pony Express Rides Again! (26.1) In the heart of downtown Saint Joseph, Missouri the “Pony…
  2. Pony Express Hood Ornament (19) On a rainy day recently I visited MacNeil’s Pony Express…
  3. Attention to Detail ~ “The Pony Express” ~ by H. A. MacNeil (17.9) On first viewing, the sculptures of Hermon MacNeil express amazing…

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JUSTICE 

is the theme of the

 United States Supreme Court 

~~~~~ 0 ~~~~~

“Justice the Guardian of Liberty”

are the words under Hermon MacNeil’s

EAST  PEDIMENT

To see Hermon MacNeil’s sculpture walk to

the back of the SUPREME COURT Building

SECOND ST NE

May 16, 1932 Note regarding the East Pediment Inscription The text, in the hand of Charles Evans Hughes, reads, I rather prefer “Justice the Guardian of Liberty””

~~~~~ 0 ~~~~~

 “Equal Justice Under the Law”

are the words under Robert Aitken’s

WEST PEDIMENT

~~~~~ 0 ~~~~~

Both PEDIMENTS celebrate JUSTICE

“Equal Justice Under the Law”

“Justice the Guardian of Liberty”

These are just two ways that Beaux Arts

Sculptors sought to preserve JUSTICE

for the PEOPLE  in our “CITY BEAUTIFUL”

Washington, D. C.

Let’s Hope Our Nine Justices do their Part for  Justice in years to come!

Related Posts:

Related Images:

~ MacNeil Bust Exhibited in 1984 ~

Months after we unveiled the Hermon MacNeil bust in 2021,

I received word that this unique piece

was exhibited 

ONLY ONCE in its

75 year history.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In 1945 Jo Davidson modeled this bust of his teacher and had it cast in bronze.  It remains a UNIQUE piece ~~ meaning “one and only,

one of a kind

NO OTHER Castings

Were ever made”

This “sui generis” likeness of

Hermon Atkins MacNeil

was purchased in 2021 from the Estate of Jo Davidson through Joel Rosenkranz of Conner~Rosenkranz, of New York City.

On Fri, Jun 4, 2021, Joel sent the following:

Hi Dan –

I hope you have been well. I recently was looking through a key reference in American sculpture and came across the entry for the Davidson MacNeil which the Davidson Estate loaned to the Newark Museum many years ago for a survey exhibition on bronzes. I thought you would like to have this reference for your files.

Best,

Joel

I replied as follows:

Joel,  

We are well and entering into life and travel in more usual ways. 

Thank you for this document scan. I appreciate more history of this MacNeil bust. I will print it out and will study it over the weekend. 

It seems ironic that this little known portrait bust was used to illustrate a bio page of Jo Davidson. There are 100s of other candidates that could illustrate Jo’s life and work but his first teacher becomes the “show & tell” model for Jo Davidson’s work and style of portraits. 

I am enjoying having “Hermon” in our living room on a regular basis. I showed him to friends and posted this “icon” on my website for the world to SEE.

Greatly appreciate your continued support of my MacNeil obsession. Also, expanding my knowledge of the Davidson—MacNeil interface raises my understanding to exponential levels. >>>

“Your love and work with Beaux Arts and your “calling” with Janis to represent the Davidson Estate form a strong testimony to the love, passion, and talent of so many of these sculptors who are easily forgotten in the “modern “ era of abstractions offered as art.  (Forgive my bias to realism).”

Related posts:

  1. The Portrait “BUST” of HERMON A. MacNEIL ~ by Jo Davidson ~ Unveiled for MacNeil Month 2021 ~#5 (10.1) AT  LAST, the UNVEILING of the 75-YEAR-OLD PORTRAIT BUST OF…
  2. New Year Discovery: Another Bust by H. A. MacNeil (7.6) As we begin the New Year of 2021, we have…
  3. MacNeil Bust of Lincoln Stored in Vault (7.5) Hermon Atkins MacNeil would probably be amused to know that…
  4. Hermon MacNeil’s bust of “Lawyer Lincoln” Returns for its second century on the Illinois Circuit (7.2) Hermon MacNeil’s bronze bust of self-educated Illinois Lawyer Abe Lincoln…
  5. MacNeil’s Bust of John Stewart Kennedy ~ 100 Years Ago ~ THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY (7.1)  A BRIEF NOTE from the Webmaster:  “We did not discover…
  6. Hermon MacNeil’s bronze bust of Evangelist Dwight L. Moody (1920) ~ “We Found It, Uncle Hermon!” (6.8)  

Related Images:

Hermon MacNeil’s Commander-in-Chief

George Washington on Arch in NYC

General George Washington with Flags (U.S. and POW/MIA) ~ Washington Arch Greenwich, NYC (Photo courtesy of: Gibson Shell – 2011)

Hermon MacNeil was a Red-White-and-Blue Sculptor of American History. 

click BELOW for MORE.

 

INDEPENDENCE DAY

 

~ ~ ~ ~ 0 ~ ~ ~ ~

 

Images  of

Independence

from the sculptures of

Hermon Atkins MacNeil …

 

Happy 4th of July

from Dan Leininger, Webmaster

The Stars and Stripes fly day and night at the home of Webmaster Dan Leininger in South Dakota. They are illuminated dusk to dawn by automatic lighting. (The tie, however, only waves on special occasions like July 4th.)

 

Related posts:

  1. INDEPENDENCE DAY Images ~ from Hermon A. MacNeil (7.4) Here are a few images of  Independence from Hermon Atkins…
  2. MacNeil Month ~~ February 2016 ~~ 150 Years (6) The year 2016 marks the sesquicentennial of the birth of…
  3. Hermon MacNeil at the 1893 Columbian Exposition ~ ~ ~ THE CHICAGO YEARS ~ ~ (6) CHICAGO YEARS:  Partners and Colleagues When Hermon MacNeil came home to the…
  4. More “Confederate Defenders” Protests; AND Ten Years Ago on this Website. (6) Sunday (July 12, 2020) saw continued protest at the Confederate…
  5. Hermon MacNeil and Hamlin Garland ~ ~ Connections Through the Years – Part 3 (6) Hermon MacNeil met Hamlin Garland in Chicago. Hermon MacNeil Hermon…
  6. MacNeil’s Bust of John Stewart Kennedy ~ 100 Years Ago ~ THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY (5.8)  A BRIEF NOTE from the Webmaster:  “We did not discover…

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Hermon MacNeil included  2 Fasces
 
in his design for the
 
East Pediment

MacNeil – Supreme Court

 

 

The 2 Fasces of the East Pediment.   On Left in yellow circle: Man with traditional fascis. On Right in green circle: Woman with a grain sheath Fascis.

Additional Examples of 

FASCES in Washington, D.C. Capitol Area:

Two fasces appear on either side of the flag of the United States behind the podium in the United States House of Representatives, with bronze examples replacing the previous gilded iron installments during the remodeling project of 1950.[9]

Podium of the

U. S. House of Representatives:

Podium of the U. S. House of Representatives

 

These 2 large Bronze fasces frame both sides of the Flag of the United States behind the podium in the United States House of Representatives.  These larger-than-life bronze examples replaced the previous gilded iron installments during the remodeling project of 1950.[9]

 

Lincoln Memorial:

Daniel Chester Frenches tribute to

Lincoln’s Preservation of the Union

Seated In the marble throne supported by two Roman fasces symbols, Daniel Chester French’s “Lincoln” gazes contemplatively over the “preserved Union.”

At the Lincoln Memorial, Lincoln’s seat of state bears the fasces—without axes—on the fronts of its arms; fasces also appear on the pylons flanking the main staircase leading into the memorial.

Mercury Dime — Winged Liberty (reverse)

Fasces from the reverse of the Liberty (Winged Mercury) Dime minted from 1916 to 1945.

Another sculptor and colleague of Hermon MacNeil, Adolph Weinman, used a fasces motif in his coin design. The reverse of the Mercury Dime, the design [used until the adoption of the current FDR dime in 1945], features a fasces on the reverse side (tails).

“The Mercury dime is a ten-cent coin struck by the United States Mint from late 1916 to 1945. Designed by Adolph Weinman and also referred to as the Winged Liberty Head dime, it gained its common name because the obverse depiction of a young Liberty, identifiable by her winged Phrygian cap, was confused with the Roman god Mercury..

Other Uses of the “Fasces” in Art and Insignia.

  1.  Statue of Freedom  Fasces ring the base of the Statue of Freedom atop the United States Capitol building
  2. A frieze on the facade of the United States Supreme Court building depicts the figure of a Roman centurion holding a fasces, to represent “order”[10]
  3. The National Guard uses the fasces on the seal of the National Guard Bureau, and it appears in the insignia of Regular Army officers assigned to National Guard liaison and in the insignia and unit symbols of National Guard units themselves; for instance, the regimental crest of the 71st Infantry Regiment (New York) of the New York National Guard consisted of a gold fasces set on a blue background
  4. The official seal of the United States Tax Court bears the fasces at its center
  5. Four fasces flank the two bronze plaques on either side of the bust of Lincoln memorializing his Gettysburg Address at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
  6. The seal of the United States Courts Administrative Office includes a fasces behind crossed quill and scroll
  7. In the Washington Monument, there is a statue of George Washington leaning on a fasces
  8. A fasces is a common element in US Army Military Police heraldry, most visibly on the shoulder sleeve insignia of the 18th Military Police Brigade and the 42nd Military Police Brigade
  9. A fasces also appears shoulder sleeve insignia of the US Army Reserve Legal Command
  10. Seated beside George Washington, a figure holds a fasces as part of The Apotheosis of Washington, a fresco mural suspended above the rotunda of the United States Capitol Building.
  11. On the podium of the Emancipation Memorial in Washington D.C., beneath Abraham Lincoln‘s right hand.  See Also: Capitol Hill Parks , National Capital Parks-East
  12. On the obverse of the 1896 $1 Educational Series note there is a fasces leaning against the wall behind the youth.
  13. In the Oval Office, above the door leading to the exterior walkway, and above the corresponding door on the opposite wall, which leads to the president’s private office; note: the fasces depicted have no axes, possibly because in the Roman Republic, the blade was always removed from the bundle whenever the fasces were carried inside the city, in order to symbolize the rights of citizens against arbitrary state power (see above). 

~~

 

Seated In the marble throne supported by two Roman fasces symbols, Lincoln gazes contemplatively over the “preserved Union.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fasces Fasces article at Wikipedia

 

Federal fasces iconography

Emancipation Memorial

Emancipation Memorial
 

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The Hermon MacNeil’s sculpture of the

East Pediment contains a hidden fasces.

~ The Fasces  (located to the left of Confucius) rests on the shoulder of the man holding the boy.  They represent the enforcement of the law and its passing on to coming generations.

A Fasces is a bound bundle of wooden rods, sometimes including an axe with its blade emerging. The fasces is an Italian symbol that had its origin in the Etruscan civilization and was passed on to ancient Rome, where it symbolized a magistrate’s power and jurisdiction. Wikipedia

~ Is There a

2nd Fasces?

~ The Female figure to the right is resting another bound form on her shoulder.

I had imagined it was a Sheaf of grain with leaves extended to the right.  There is also a young girl (half visible to her right).  Again the presence of the YOUTH suggests ‘the “Carrying on” of civilization through a internal knowledge of right and wrong’.

But being bound as a fasces,

it shares that same symbolism of

power and jurisdiction” 

MacNeil described the right side or the Pediment as

tempering justice with mercy, allegorically treated”.

Visitors often miss the East Pediment of the Supreme Court Building because it is located at the rear of the building. This sculptural group was designed by Hermon A. MacNeil (1866–1947), an artist who studied under the masters of classical architecture and design. Cass Gilbert (1859–1934), the architect of the building, worked closely with MacNeil from 1932 to 1934 to create the thirteen symmetrically balanced allegorical figures. MacNeil submitted the following description of his work to the Supreme Court Building Commission:

“Law as an element of civilization was normally and naturally derived or inherited in this country from former civilizations. The ‘Eastern Pediment’ of the Supreme Court Building suggests therefore the treatment of such fundamental laws and precepts as are derived from the East. Moses, Confucius and Solon are chosen as representing three great civilizations
and form the central group of this Pediment.

Flanking this central group—left—is the symbolical figure bearing the means of enforcing the law. On the right a group tempering justice with mercy, allegorically treated. The ‘Youth’ is brought into both these groups to suggest the “Carrying on” of civilization through the knowledge imbibed of right and wrong. The next two figures with shields; Left – The settlement of disputes between states through enlightened judgment. Right—Maritime and other large functions of the Supreme
Court in protection of the United States. The last figures: Left—Study and pondering of judgments. Right – A tribute to the fundamental and supreme character of this Court.

Finale—The fable of the Tortoise and the Hare.”~

Fasces

Fasces is a bound bundle of wooden rods, sometimes including an axe with its blade emerging. The fasces is an Italian symbol that had its origin in the Etruscan civilization and was passed on to ancient Rome, where it symbolized a magistrate’s power and jurisdiction. Wikipedia

Related posts:

  1. SUPREME COURT – Arrival at last! (16.7) “Slow but steady wins the race.”  So said Aesop in…
  2. Moses, Confucius, and Solon at Supreme Court (16.5) The East Pediment of the Supreme Court of the United…
  3. Hermon MacNeil’s Supreme Court Sculptures: ~ ~ ~ Moses Revisited ~ ~ ~ (16.3) When the Supreme Court justices considered whether the Ten Commandments…
  4. Hermon MacNeil’s Supreme Court Sculptures: ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ The Tortoise & the Hare Revisited ~ ~ ~ (15.2)    At each corner of the East Pediment of the…
  5. JOURNEY TO SUPREME COURT: ~ Finds plenty of Sculpture along the way in Washington D.C. … (14.4) I recently visited our nation’s Capitol with family. Sculpture and…
  6. Tortoise and Hare taken to Supreme Court (13.6) Hermon MacNeil has taken the Tortoise and the Hare to…

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After the adoption of the US Constitution in 1789 and for the next 146 years, the United States Supreme Court had no permanent home.   Briefly from 1789 to 1800, the Federal Government functioned out of Philadelphia, and then New York City until the permanent Capitol was built in the District of Columbia.  Finally, in 1800 the U.S. Federal Government moved into Washington, D.C.

Painting: “British Burn the Capitol, 1814,” Allyn Cox, 1974, Corridor, House wing, First Floor.

The Supreme Court of the United States, however, changed its meeting place a half dozen times within the Capitol.  After the British burned the Capitol in the War of 1812, the Court convened in a private home.  Eventually, from 1860 until 1935, the Court sat in what is now known as the “Old Senate Chamber.”

Hermon Atkins MacNeil (1866 -1947)

Cass Gilbert architect (1859 – 1934)

Though considered a co-equal branch, the Judicial function seemed a “nomadic” tenant of space in the growing Capitol until 1929.  A former President, who later served as Chief Justice, changed that itinerant existence.

Chief Justice Wm. Howard Taft 1921

In 1929 Chief Justice William Howard Taft, who had been President of the United States from 1909 to 1913, persuaded Congress to end this arrangement and authorize the construction of a permanent home for the Court.  Architect Cass Gilbert was charged by Chief Justice Taft to design “a building of dignity and importance suitable for its use as the permanent home of the Supreme Court of the United States.”  [Gilbert and Taft were both Ohioans and life long friends.]

Neither Taft nor Gilbert survived to see the Supreme Court Building completed. Construction proceeded under the direction of Chief Justice Hughes and architects Cass Gilbert, Jr., and John R. Rockart. The construction, begun in 1932, was completed in 1935, when the Court was finally able to occupy its own building.

Hermon MacNeil and Architects

Hermon MacNeil trained in Paris at the Ecole de Beaux Arts with both sculptors and architects.  He later won the Reinhart Prize and again studied with architects and sculptors from 1896 to 1899 at the American Academy in Rome.

The New York Architectural League wanted an award medallion to present to architects and sculptors.  They commissioned Hermon MacNeil to create a suitable medal.   Photos of MacNeil’s original clay masters may be viewed here: [CLICK HERE].   These clay were reduced onto the steel dies used  press the final medallions pictured below.

Later A. A. Weinman and Hermon MacNeil were both awarded this commemorative creation.  Weinman designed the Walking Liberty half dollar and the Mercury dime 

The actual medal presented to Weinman is pictured below.  It resides in the webmaster’s private collection.

New York Architectural League Medal.  Designed by Hermon MacNeil this is the actual medallion awarded to A. A. Weinmann.  https://www.pafa.org/museum/collection/item/medal-honor-sculpture-architectural-league-new-york Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts

Hermon MacNeil and Cass Gilbert

MacNeil added sculptures to at least two of Cass Gilbert’s many buildings and monument projects.

  1. United States Supreme Court 1928-1935[9] Washington, DC
  2. St. Louis Art Museum 1901-1904[12] Saint Louis, MO

 

MacNeil & the Supreme Court Building

The Supreme Court website suggests Gilbert was directly involved with the sculptor’s designs.

Cass Gilbert, the building’s architect, worked closely with MacNeil from 1932 to 1934 to create the thirteen symmetrically balanced figures above the Corinthian portico. 

The central marble figures on this rarely noticed eastern pediment depict the theme “Justice – The Guardian of Liberty.”  Sculptor MacNeil’s central figures represent three great Eastern civilizations from which our laws are derived.  These figures portray lawgivers: Moses (receiver of Hebrew Ten Commandments) flanked by Confucius (Chinese philosopher and teacher) and Solon (Athenian lawmaker, statesman, and poet).  Confucius is on the viewers’ left, Solon to the right, both flanking Moses with his hands on two separate tablets. 1

MacNeil & the St. Louis Art Museum (Palace of Fine Arts).

 

To view this collaboration from 1912: CLICK HERE 

 

 

 


Photos:

  1.  Painting: “British Burn the Capitol, 1814,” Allyn Cox, 1974, Corridor, House wing, First Floor. (https://www.aoc.gov/explore-capitol-campus/blog/most-magnificent-ruin-burning-capitol-during-war-1812)
  2. “The East Pediment”  https://www.supremecourt.gov/about/east_pediment_11132013.pdf. SEE ALSO: “Religious Symbols Inside & Outside the U.S. Supreme Court Building”.  Assembled by Nathaniel Segal 2014  http://nathanielsegal.mysite.com/TenCommandments/10SupremeCourtBuilding.html
  3. This Unique “New York Architectural League” Award Medal links H. A. MacNeil & A. A. Weinman.   Posted by: | here on Sept. 01, 2022  https://hermonatkinsmacneil.com/2022/09/01/this-unique-new-york-architectural-league-award-medal-links-h-a-macneil-a-a-weinman/
  4. “New York Architectural League Medal” ~Original Clay Models saved from the MacNeil Studio ~ 1947 Posted by: | here on Sept. 16, 2022 https://hermonatkinsmacneil.com/2022/09/16/new-york-architectural-league-medal-original-clay-models-saved-from-the-macneil-studio-1947/

Research Sources:

  1. Cass Gilbert Society: Selected Works.  Retrieved at https://www.cassgilbertsociety.org/works/  on May, 20, 2023
  2. Cass Gilbert Society: Biography.  Retrieved at https://www.cassgilbertsociety.org/architect/bio.html  on May, 20, 2023

Related Images:

Julie Tsirkin reports “Debt Limit Deal Reached!”

 

As Will Rogers’ statue watches behind her

Jo Davidson, sculptor, 1921

Thanks to Jo Davidson, 

“Will Rogers” is keeping his eye on Congress!

Hermon MacNeil’s “studio boy” became renowned sculptor Jo Davidson of portrait busts.

Jo Davidson looks uo to his bronze “Will Rogers” in his Paris Studio before came to the U.S.

 Perhaps you saw

Julie Tsirkin,

Capitol correspondent,

report from the U.S. Capitol.

“Debt Limit Deal Reached!”

 Sometimes you just see the “Will’s” legs and the shoes. But Will wanted his eyes kept on Congress.  So “The old head hunter” (Will’s nickname for Jo) made his head turned so he could look down at Congress members as they walked into the Chamber.

 

 

~  ~  0  ~  ~

“There are men running governments

who shouldn’t be allowed

to play with matches.”

Will Rogers

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

I don’t make jokes.

I just watch the government

and report the facts.

Will Rogers

 

 

Will Rogers statue in US Capitol sculpted by Jo Davidson who began his career as a “studio boy” for Hermon MacNeil in College Point.

If you could ever see the marble base it would reveal three words:

Will Rogers

Oklahoma

 

The Washington, D.C. version of the statue was unveiled in 1939.[11] At that unveiling on June 6, Senator Joshua B. Lee said of Rogers’ effect on the United States during the Depression, “His humor was the safety valve for American Life.”[12]  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Will_Rogers_(Davidson)

 

 

The House Connecting corridor is the common visual background for Capitol news briefings.   The nameless, but familiar, dark bronze legs or full statue, represent Will’s last wish.

Last Wish of

 

Will Rogers

“I need to keep my eyes

 

on Congress.”

 

Jo Davidson’s statue watched on January 6, 2021 as raging Trump protestors turned into rioters (mixed with vigilantes) attacking the Capitol Building. [ breaking windows, carrying fire arms, vandalizing desks and offices, creating chaos and danger … ]

Senators were in the Constitutional process of certifying the votes of the Electoral College which  authorizes the Inauguration of the 46th President on January 20, 2021.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

HUMOR from 100 years ago:

(Then tell me if Will Rogers still speaks to us in 2023.)

  1. “When you find yourself in a hole, quit digging.” – Will Rogers
  2. “The short memories of the American voters is what keeps our politicians in office.” – Will Rogers
  3. “If pro is the opposite of con, what is the opposite of Congress?” – Will Rogers
  4. “If stupidity got us in this mess, how come it can’t get us out.” – Will Rogers
  5. “A fool and his money are soon elected.” – Will Rogers
  6. “I don’t make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts.” – Will Rogers
  7. “The more you observe politics, the more you’ve got to admit that each party is worse than the other.” – Will Rogers
  8. “Ten men in our country could buy the whole world and ten million can’t buy enough to eat.” – Will Rogers
  9. “It takes a lifetime to build a good reputation, but you can lose it in a minute.” – Will Rogers
  10. “An onion can make people cry, but there has never been a vegetable invented to make them laugh.” – Will Rogers
  11. “The difference between death and taxes is that death doesn’t get worse every time Congress meets.” – Will Rogers
  12. “I am not a member of any organized political party — I am a Democrat.” – Will Rogers
  13. “Be thankful we’re not getting all the government we’re actually paying for.” – Will Rogers
  14. “There is no trick to being a humorist when you have the whole government working for you.” – Will Rogers
  15. “All I know is just what I read in the papers, and that’s an alibi for my ignorance.” – Will Rogers

Related posts:

  1. DC Capitol Assault? by “Trump-it-eers!” ~~ What Would Will Rogers Say about January 6, 2021 ? (9.6) Jo Davidson was the “studio boy” for Hermon Atkins MacNeil…
  2. Will Rogers Bedroom ~ Ponca City ~ Post # 4 ~ (7.7) E.W. Marland the colorful oil baron of the 1910s and…

CREDITS:

  1. Photo: Will Rogers Statue https://www.visitthecapitol.gov/exhibitions/timeline/image/will-rogers-jo-davidson-1938
  2. Will Rogers Quotes: https://inspirationfeed.com/will-rogers-quotes/
  3. Will Rogers Bio:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Will_Rogers_(Davidson)

 

Related Images:

Augusta Savage

As mentioned in the previous post [on May 5, 2023] Savage applied for a summer art program at the Fontainebleau School of Fine Arts in France.[9] She was accepted, BUT THEN rejected because she was BLACK.

Sculptor, Hermon Atkins MacNeil, wrote a letter of protest to W.E.B. Dubois, then Hermon invited Augusta to study with him.  She later cited Hermon as one of her teachers.”

All of that took place in 1923,

THEN, 15 YEARS Later . . . the

1939 New York World’s Fair

premiered her work —

 

“The Harp”  

 

OR

 

“Lift Every Voice and Sing”

 

Book page with photograph
An intriguing image of a sculpture from Claude McKay’s 1940 publication, Harlem: Negro Metropolisa narrative on the history of Harlem and its most notable African American residents.   The book includes photographs of works by Black artist Augusta Savage in the early 20th century. The photographic portrait of what is a likely a maquette of  the 1939 New York World’s Fair, Lift Every Voice and Sing”.

It remains a rare material artifact of a fair centerpiece since lost to time, and a clue to the importance of her high-profile commission for American culture and Black artistry.

Standing at 16 feet in height and one of only two works by African American artists featured in the exhibition, Savage’s plaster sculpture took its name from James Weldon and J. Rosamond Johnson’s “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” a hymn of particular meaning within Black communities. Savage modeled the piece after themes found in the song—unity, perseverance through faith, and pride, all of which are reflected in her musical scene. The harp’s form is defined by a long arm and hand cradling 12 singers in choir robes, their strong stance and the folds of their garments evocative of strings. A young man kneels in the lead holding sheet music and carrying a pensive expression on his face, uplifted (we imagine) by the beautiful melody and the image the eponymous hymn’s words recall.

“The Harp,” as it became known, was a major achievement for Savage. Born Augusta Christine Fells in Green Cove, Florida, February 29, 1892, she was raised by a Methodist minister who opposed her creative interests. Over her father’s objections, Savage returned again and again to sculpture throughout her youth and—after marrying, having a child, and becoming widowed by her early 20s—committed her focus to the arts and moved to New York City with less than $5 in her pocket. Savage quickly became a recognized talent in the art world and a vocal advocate for equal rights, generating media attention when an American selection committee revoked her award of a summer study-abroad scholarship to Paris because of her race. Defying these obstacles, Savage self-funded and completed a 4-year arts degree at The Cooper Union in 3 years, fundraised for her own trips to France to exhibit at prestigious sites like the Salon d’Automne and Grand Palais, and earned an array of accolades ranging from a Carnegie Foundation travel grant to the distinction of being the only African American member admitted into the National Association of Women Painters and Sculptors. By 1937, the 1939 New York World’s Fair Board of Design reached out to her with the idea of a large-scale sculpture symbolizing the legacy of African American music.

Though 44 million guests had the chance to witness and admire Savage’s triumph at the 19-month exhibition, unfortunately the work was destroyed when the fair ended, a scenario not uncommon for temporary works and pavilions. Promotional postcards and documentary photos like the one in McKay’s book, however, paint a picture of the song and sculpture’s true impact and continued resonance. Today, “Lift Every Voice and Sing” is still widely celebrated as the “Black national anthem” (recently and memorably performed at “Beychella”) and metal replicas of Savage’s 1939 tribute—a testament to the inspirational power of the Black church and indomitable nature of the human spirit—are held in collections such as those of the Schomburg Center in Harlem and Columbus Museum in Georgia.

– Carlos Ascurra, FIU Humanities Edge curatorial intern

  1. “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lift_Every_Voice_and_Sing_(sculpture)#Replicas.
  2. Book page, “Sculpture by Augusta Savage, evocative of Negro music; commissioned by the New York World’s Fair,” from Harlem: Negro Metropolis,  1940  
  3. Augusta Savage (American, 1892–1962),  author
    E. P. Dutton & Company, Inc., New York City, publisher
    The Wolfsonian–FIU, Gift of Historical Design, New York City, XC2019.02.1.12
  4. The Body is Memory: An Exhibition of Black Women Artists.  Retrieved on May 1, 2023 at  [https://sites.smith.edu/afr111-f19/the-harp/ ]
  5. Claude McKay,  Harlem: Negro Metropolis, 1940.  A  narrative history of Harlem and its most notable African American residents.   The book includes photographs of works by Black artist Augusta Savage in the early 20th century.
  1.  

Related Images:

Mansion of E. W. Marland in Ponca City, Oklahoma is now a museum.

E.W. Marland the colorful oil baron of the 1910s and 1920s, was also a U.S. Congressman, as well as the 10th Governor of Oklahoma.

His dream was to live in a palace, and so he built this majestic home.The Marland Mansion & Estate, completed in 1928 after nearly three years.

The Marlands’ Mysterious Legacy

CLICK HERE THE FULL STORY:

 

WILL ROGERS BEDROOM

On our recent tour of the Marland Mansion in Ponca City, Oklahoma, we entered the

“Will Rogers Bedroom.”

THE foursome of

  1. E. W. Marland,
  2. Will Rogers,
  3. Jo Davidson and
  4. Hermon MacNeil

seem an unlikely quartet.  

However, their paths crossed multiple times, especially in the “Pioneer Woman” project.

  • Marland recruited Davidson to come to Ponca City where he had built a studio for a sculptor.
  • Davidson completed statues of Marland family members and traveled with Marland across the U.S. in his private railroad car.
  • Marland invited Will Rogers to speak at the unveiling of the “Pioneer Woman”, to great public acclaim.
  • Will Rogers stayed at the Mansion many times.
  • Hermon MacNeil and his student, Jo Davidson, both submitted models for the “Pioneer Woman”.
  • Will Rogers called Davidson “That old head hunter” because he asked to do Will’s portrait so many times.
  • Davidson returned to MacNeil’s studio in 1945 to complete a portrait bust of his teacher, H. A. MacNeil. He then made a unique bronze casting of the piece. It graces the banner of this site.—>>
  • In 1947 the American Academy of Arts and Letters hosted a retrospective featuring nearly 200 of Jo Davidson’s works..

 

The Marland Mansion in Ponca City has a picture of Will Rogers on the Bedroom wall.

 Betty Rogers, widow of Will, signed the photo as follows:

To Governor Marland,

    With Sincere regard,

         Betty Rogers

_________

~~~~~~~~

 

Picture

Will Rogers was the closing speaker at the 1930 unveiling and Dedication of the “Pioneer Woman” statue.

Related Images:

Categories : Location, Oklahoma, Statue
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“HAPPY BIRTHDAY

UNCLE HERMON”

HE WAS BORN 157 YEARS AGO TODAY

FEBRUARY 27TH, 1866

Hermon Atkins MacNeil (American, 1866-1947) CAROL BROOKS MACNEIL, N.D. Bronzed plaster 14 1/2″ x 8″ x 7 1/2″ Signed: H. A. MACNEIL. Photo by JOEL ROSENKRANZ 1986 (#5430)

THIS UNDATED CLAY PORTRAIT BUST OF

“CARRIE” BY HERMON

“Brooks-by-MacNeil” Portrait

closes Brooks~MacNeil Month ~~ on Feb. 27, 2023

Thanks, Joel Rosenkranz

This photo was included in an email to Jim Haas, MacNeil biographer, and myself from Joel Rosenkranz.

Hi Jim & Dan:

The upcoming exhibition on A.F Brooks in Kenilworth prompted me to go through photos I took in 1986 when I first visited descendants and purchased a variety of work including this portrait of Carol Brooks by Hermon.

It is plaster with a colored bronze surface.

I sold it in 1987 and have no idea where it is now but at least there is this record.

Best, Joel 

 

So on this the 157th Anniversary of Hermon MacNeil’s birth, this portrait seems an appropriate “Last Look” for our Brooks~MacNeil Month of 2023. 

Sculpted in clay, finished with bronze patina, the piece radiates a lot of love and care.  Bearing no date by Hermon clay-portrait Bust of Carol (Carrie) Brooks MacNeil 

NO DATE?  Made by her husband, Hermon MacNeil at an unknown date. (Webmaster suggests 1894 in the Summer of

WHAT Features  date it?

  • it appears to be a “young Carrie” Possibly, dating to her early days before marriage? 
  • clay, but finished lovingly in a bronze  patina;
  • but never cast in bronze, which is an expensive process.
  • seems to come from a period of a young sculptor, with more talent and more love than cash.
  • preserved in unknown hands for 80+ years
  • photographed and purchased by Joel Rosenkranz in 1986
  • then sold in 1987
  • NOW IN A PRIVATE COLLECTION, SOME WHERE, but
  • HERE on //HermonAtkinsMacNeil.com FOR ALL TO ENJOY

ALL Offered to you NOW as a  celebration of Carol “CARRIE” Brooks MacNeil.

AS OUR FINALE TO THIS

“2023 MACNEIL-BROOKS MONTH” 

 

On the 157th Anniversary of

“Uncle Hermon MacNeil’s birth

February 27th, 1866.

 

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

Appeal: 

If you have any history or insight about this piece

by Hermon MacNeil, PLEASE COMMENT HERE

or email us at HAMacNeil@gmail.com

UPDATE: 

In a later post I wrote the following regarding the White Rabbits reunion at Bass Lake, Indiana in 1894 and following:

Friendships and Romance.  While creating the these buildings and sculptures, there evolved a unique community of White City artists.  The collegiality extended through the years. Several friendships evolved into marriage.   Both Garland and MacNeil found their life partners in Larado Taft”s assistants, The White Rabbits.  A recurring community of Camp Life sprung up:

[1] “The spirit of playful camaraderie among the city’s artists was manifest in the first of several outings to Bass Lake, Indiana.  For two weeks in August 1894 Potter experienced invigorating camp life with the sculptors Lorado Taft, Carrie Brooks, Hermon Atkins MacNeil, Lew Wall Moore, and Edward and Laura Swing Kemeys, And the painters Charles Francis Browne, Carl Heber, and Menthe Svenden.  Between recreational activities and spirited antics, painters and sculptors alike engaged in plein-air oil sketching of the scenery.  Evenings were given over to art lectures illustrated by the stereopticon projected on a make shift screen consisting  of a sheet stretched between trees.  Such a good time was had that the artist arranged another merry outing for September.  There after the excursions became annual events.” 

[1] Julie Aronson, Bessie Potter Vonnoh: Sculptor of Women, Cincinnati Art Museum: Ohio University Press; Athens, Ohio. 2008, p. 31.

Posted previously HERE

 

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  4. February 27, 2021 – We”ll Unveil the Newly Discovered Portrait Bust of Hermon A. MacNeil by Jo Davidson on Hermon’s Birthday (6) ~~ MacNeil Month – February 27, 2021 ~~ FIFTH Story…
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#1. A “Tortoise and Hare” are hiding at the Supreme Court

That’s no FABLE, Aesop! 

They’ve been there for 91 years. Hiding on back of the building.

Can you see them there?

The ‘Hare’ of Aesop’s fable as to ‘Slow but Steady’ Justice.

The ‘Tortoise’ of Aesop’s fable as MacNeil’s Finale of Justice.

Maybe this

HELPS?

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

 

Plus #2 the 

‘Supreme Secret’

from the  Family …

MacNeil.

Guess, WHO SCULPTED the Tortoise and the Hare on the East Pediment?”

NOW, just this week,

Carolyn Saul (‘Carrie’ MacNeil’s  grand niece)

shared a MacNeil family story, 3 generations old. 

“I was always told that

Hermon let one of his sons

design the tortoise and the hare. 

Have you heard that?

[Yes,  I heard  that “tender tidbit”  years ago

but it never became a story on this site.]

WHICH son, Claude or Alden?   This bit of MacNeil Lore does not say.  Claude worked in aviationAlden was an architect, who formally studied art at Fountainbleu.

The brothers are described in the March 1928 Obituary of their younger sister Joie Katherine MacNeil as follows:

She leaves behind her parents, two brothers, Alden a recent graduate of Cornell University and now a student in the famous Fountainbleu art school, and Claude, an aviator and mechanical engineer on the staff of the Sikorsky Aircraft Manufacturing Company at College Point.  Source: The Daily Star, Queens Borough, Tuesday Evening, March 20, 1928. Page 4, column 7.

Alden seems the more probable

of Hermon’s sons to assist in the 1932

rendering of the East Pediment pair

of the Tortoise and Hare.

NOW, Carolyn’s comment validates that idea from

MacNeil-family-lore

through three generations.

~ ~ ~ ~

The MacNeil’s SUPREME COURT statues

JUSTICE THE GUARDIAN OF LIBERTY”

Are the most viewed pages on this website.

Here’s just two days of page views to sample from MacNeil Month:

 

Page Titles viewed on Feb. 10, 2023
  Views
1. Hermon MacNeil’s Supreme Court Sculptures: ~ ~ ~ Moses Revisited ~ ~ ~   6
2. Home page / Archives   5
3. Moses, Confucius, and Solon at Supreme Court

TOTALS:

  2

13

 

 
“SLOW BUT STEADY”
 
Justice WINS the RACE
 
Thanks, Uncle Hermon
 
 

Related Images:

Hermon MacNeil’s 3 Sculptures

for Presidents Day

2023

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presidents Day honors the February birthdays of

George Washington (Feb 22nd) and

Abraham Lincoln (Feb. 12th)

Presidents’ Day, officially Washington’s Birthday, in the United States

(third Monday in February)

popularly recognized as honoring

George Washington and Abraham Lincoln.

The day is sometimes understood as a celebration of the

birthdays and lives of all U.S. presidents.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

View MacNeil’s Presidents yourself > > > >

George WashingtonPostings of MacNeil’s

George Washington as Commander-in-Chief

CLICK HERE 

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

Abraham Lincoln  –   Postings of MacNeil’s

Abraham LincolnPrairie Lawyer

CLICK HERE

 

William McKinley – Postings of MacNeil’s

William McKinkey

CLICK HERE

 

HAPPY PRESIDENTS DAY 2023

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  3. Happy Birthday Mr. Washington! ~ Part TWO ~ MacNeil Month #6 ~ The President Who would NOT be King. (4) NOTE: February 22nd marks the 279th Birthday of George Washington….
  4. INDEPENDENCE DAY Images ~ from Hermon A. MacNeil (4) Here are a few images of  Independence from Hermon Atkins…
  5. Hermon Atkins MacNeil to be featured in “The Galley” (4) Hermon MacNeil was the first president of the Clan MacNeil…
  6. 153rd Anniversary of the Birth of Hermon Atkins MacNeil ~ American Sculptor ~ Feb 27, 1866 (4) I never met Hermon MacNeil. I never met my maternal…

Related Images:

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Our 1st SerendipityIn December 2022 an order came in for three (3) MacNeil Medallions.

In eight years of offering these commemoratives, no one has ever asked for three.  I was so surprised, that I mistakenly shipped 2 medals.

Duuh ...

The buyer pointed out my error; and I apologized and sent a third medallion. 

The 2nd Serendipity.   In corresponding with the buyer, I asked,

“Are you a SLQ (Standing Liberty Quarter) collector or a

MacNeil enthusiast?”

The answer below surprised and pleased me greatly

“I am the great niece of Carol (Carrie) MacNeil. Alden Finney Brooks was my great  grandfather.  I have been corresponding with Jim Haas for many years. Your medallion is beautiful.

While these medallions have reached over a hundred people I’ve labeled: “Friends of HermonAtkinsMacNeil.com”; I have never knowingly found a MacNeil relative.  In the second mailing included an article I wrote for The Galley (the Clan MacNeil Magazine) to make amends.

The buyer, Carolyn Saul, added:

“I have been looking at your website.  You have a treasure!

I have been to Brookgreen Gardens to see Hermon’s statues and to the Columbus Capitol to see his work there.  Well and the Supreme Court Building.  I was always told that Hermon let one of his sons design the tortoise and the hare.  Had you heard that?

The ‘Tortoise’ of Aesop’s fable as MacNeil’s Finale.

The ‘Hare’ of Aesop’s fable as to ‘Slow but Steady’ Justice.

While I heard that “tender tidbit” years ago, it slipped from my memory, and never became a story on this site. NOW, Carolyn’s comment validates  it as MacNeil-family-lore through three generations.  It makes a fitting “punch line” to Hermon’s “humor” of framing the East Pediment with a Greek (Eastern) fable.

 

 

Definition:  Serendipitous – occurring or discovered by chance in a happy or beneficial way,  “a serendipitous encounter”

Stay Tuned for our 3rd Serendipity in next post.

Related posts:

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  2. Moses, Confucius, and Solon at Supreme Court (3) The East Pediment of the Supreme Court of the United…
  3. SUPREME COURT – Arrival at last! (3) “Slow but steady wins the race.”  So said Aesop in…
  4. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg ~~~ has DIED this evening! (3) Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died.  She was the first Jewish…
  5. 2023 MacNeil Month becomes “MacNeil~Brooks” Month (3)  MacNeil Month becomes MacNeil~Brooks Month in 2023 Each February is…
  6. Hermon MacNeil’s Supreme Court Sculptures: ~ ~ ~ Moses Revisited ~ ~ ~ (2) When the Supreme Court justices considered whether the Ten Commandments…

 

Related Images:

All of Hermon MacNeil’s Lifeworks

enshrine the PAST.

SO… What is the Future of the Past?

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ ~

The Chicago Monuments Project

Throughout 2021 the Chicago Monuments Project  has been pursuing its Mission.  From over 500 public monuments in the City of Chicago, the Project has identified 41 for review related to the following issues:

  • Promoting narratives of white supremacy 
  • Presenting inaccurate and/or demeaning characterizations of American Indians 
  • Memorializing individuals with connections to racist acts, slavery, and genocide 
  • Presenting selective, over-simplified, one-sided views of history 
  • Not sufficiently including other stories, in particular those of women, people of color, and themes of labor, migration, and community building 
  • Creating tension between people who see value in these artworks and those who do not    [ Source: https://chicagomonuments.org/about ]

 

  The PAST is under REVIEW  


Hermon MacNeil’s

Marquette-Jolliet-Illini Indian Memorial

is one of the 41 under review.

Webmaster, Dan Neil Leininger and Donna on their first visit to the Marquette – jolliet – Ilini monument at Marshall and Twenty-fourth Boulevard in Chicago.

A report of recommendations is expected to be released in

Summer of 2022

The Project created written introductions for each of the 41 pieces being reviewed.  MacNeil’s Jacques Marquette-Louis Jolliet Memorial is introduced as follows:

Title: Jacques Marquette-Louis Jolliet Memorial

Date: 1926

Artist:  Hermon Atkins MacNeil (1866-1947)

Location:  Marshall and 24th Blvd

Context:  As the first Europeans to explore and document the northern portion of the Mississippi, which included the river link from the Great Lakes to the Mississippi basin through what would become Chicago, French missionary Jacques Marquette and the Quebec-born cartographer Louis Jolliet, along with their Indian guides, are ubiquitous figures in the modern iconography of the founding of Chicago.

This imposing representation of Marquette and Jolliet, with a subservient American Indian at their side, was created by Hermon Atkins McNeil, the academically trained sculptor who contributed the relief sculptures of Marquette’s life to the extraordinary decorative cycle at the Marquette Building in thirty years earlier, in 1895.

Other representations of Marquette include the commemorative plaques near the site of the Damen Avenue Bridge (1930) and at the DuSable Bridge (1925), as well as on the northeast DuSable Bridge pylon (1928).

Source: Chicago Monuments Project (https://chicagomonuments.org/monuments/jacques-marquette-louis-jolliet-memorial) retrieved March 28, 2022


“Statues of Limitations:

     Jackson Healy, Staff Writer for the  The DePaulia  ~ The Student News Site of DePaul University offered an insightful article on

“Statues of limitations:

future of 41 monuments up in air

as Chicago reckons with its nation’s past”

On July 17, 2020, amid a nationwide racial reckoning triggered by the murder of George Floyd by former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, a violent clash between police and protesters broke out after the protesters attempted to topple the city’s statue of Christopher Columbus in Grant Park, resulting in 12 arrests and at least 18 injured officers.

One week later, the statue was “temporarily” removed at Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s discretion, and on August 12, the mayor’s office announced a citywide review of public monuments through what would become known as the Chicago Monuments Project.

The project consists of a 30-person advisory committee made up of city officials, artists, scholars, curators, architects and community leaders dedicated to assessing the city’s public works. The committee gathers input from community members and eventually will release a report with recommendations on how the city should handle its more controversial monuments, as well as a list of potential new monuments that could be commissioned.

[ For entire article CLICK HERE: ]

 

 

MacNeil’s depiction of Marquette has the priest with an inviting open right hand as his left hand holds out a crucifix above his heart.  Their (Illini) Indian guide looks on in seeming fascination.

MacNeil’s Marquette-Jolliet-Illini Memorial

“Whether they’re made

of bronze or marble,

apparently not all of Chicago’s monuments

are set in stone.”

Statues of limitations

We eagerly await the Chicago Monument Project

report scheduled to be released Summer of 2022.

Related Images:

Cecelia W. Muench MacNeil

In 1944 Carol Louise Brooks MacNeil died after extended illness. 

During her months of declining health, she was nursed at home by her family and a home health nurse named, Cecelia Weick Muench, RN. 

Cecelia MacNeil, RN (1945). Born Cecelia Weick in 1897. She served as a nurse in WWI in the European theater. She married Karl Weick in about 1920.

Cecelia Weick had served in the US Army as a battlefield Nurse during the World WarCaring for wound soldiers in war zones during WWI, she was no stranger to trauma and suffering.

As a young girl, her father taught her to appreciate art and took her to museums.  He introduced her to “The Sun Vow” at the MMA.  He told her that Hermon MacNeil was a “great American sculptor”. So she knew the name and fame of the Sculptors Macneil all her adult life.

So when an opportunity came for Cecelia to enter the MacNeil home and care for Carol during her dying months, she was more than just “another nurse.”  She was a battle-hardened R.N. who could appreciate the works and careers of these two sculptors as their lives were parting in the months of Carol’s dying. 

She must have brought a nurse’s compassion and an art lovers appreciation with her into this family of sculptors.

In her later years, Cecelia described herself by saying:

“I am familiar, too familiar, with death and dying, with the totality that is the human condition.” 1

She had a front row seat to Hermon’s lived-grief over the loss of his “Carrie.”  But as Carol’s condition worsened, the needs exceeded the home-care options of the day.  She was admitted to the Jamacia (Queens) Hospital.

Eventually, Carol Brooks MacNeil died there on June 22, 1944.

With the death of Carol MacNeil on June 22, 1944, the fifty-year partnership of the “Sculptors MacNeil” ended.  Their connection which began in the “White City” of the Chicago Worlds Fair, continued through their years of training in Rome and Paris, maturing in Queens, NY, during the four decades they shared their College Point Studio and home.

For the next two years Hermon MacNeil continued to live alone in his College Point home.   Next door was to the stone Studio building where he and Carol had sculpted together through the years of their marriage.   Hermon must have felt an emptiness without Carol in his life, home and studio.

Postcard of MacNeil studio in College Point. From the webmaster’s collection.

Two 2nd Marriages

Hermon married Cecilia W. Muench in 1945.  Cecelia was nearly 30 years younger than Hermon.  Both of them had been recently widowed.

After serving in the World War, Cecelia Muench had married and continued her career as a RN.  In 1940 a snapshot of her life was captured in the 1940 U.S. Census.  She was 43 years old living in Queens, New York, with Karl, her husband, two daughters, Dorothy (18), Sarah (17) and a son, Karl (13).   Her mother, Anna Weick also lived with the family. 

Cecilia Weick first heard the name of “Hermon Atkins MacNeil” in 1909 on her 12th birthday.  To celebrate, her father took her to the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  Ascending into the American Wing, they sat down on a bench near MacNeil’s sculpture group of “The Sun Vow.”  After at least five minutes of silence my father commented.

“Ceil, the man who created this work is surely one of the greatest American Sculptors. Never, never forget his name.”

I am still a romantic.  My father’s words were to be part of my destiny.  37 years later I married Hermon Atkins MacNeil.

The photo on the cover shows the original plaster model of Hermon Atkins MacNeil’s “The Sun Vow”, executed in Rome while the sculptor was on a Reinhart scholarship.

Cecelia told this story of her 12th birthday in opening paragraphs of an article that she published in 1974, under the title, “Sculptor Americanus: Hermon Atkins MacNeil.” 1 Two additional articles completed the series of her remembrances.

Sculptor Americanus

MORE from this series of articles by Cecelia Weick MacNeil will be told in …

— February 2022 —

“MacNeil Month”

So return

here

to

 

https://hermonatkinsmacneil.com/

for

MORE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

SOURCES:

  1. Cecelia MacNeil with Dr. Allen Nestle. “Sculptor Americanus: Hermon Atkins MacNeil”.   (First in a Series of Three), The Antiques Journal, April 1974,  pp. 10-13, 54.
  2. Lynn H. Burnett. (Editor’s Comments:)“Hermon Atkins MacNeil in Historical Perspective”.  The Antiques Journal April 1974, pp. 4, 5, 48.
  3. Cecelia MacNeil with Dr. Allen Nestle. “Sculptor Americanus: Hermon Atkins MacNeil”.   (Second in a Series of Three), The Antiques Journal, May 1974,  pp. 28-31.
  4. Cecelia MacNeil with Dr. Allen Nestle. “Sculptor Americanus: Hermon Atkins MacNeil”.   (Third in a Series of Three), The Antiques Journal, June 1974,  pp. 32-35, 51.
  5.  

 

Related Images:

Out of public view, deep in the archives of the Chicago Art Institute rests a 127 year old bust of Charles F. Browne,  American artist.

Cast in Bronze with a dark brown patina, the piece is signed on pedestal; “MacNeil ’94” / “American Art Bronze Foundry. J. Berchem. / Chicago”

Charles Francis Browne, MacNeil Colleague and American Artist.

The subject was Hermon MacNeil’s colleague, frontier traveling companion, and studio mate in their Marquette Building studio.  The piece came out of their years in Chicago after the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition.

The archival piece enters its third century of history “OFF VIEW” at the archives of  the Art Institute of Chicago.  Here we offered it exclusively to You, —“Friends of Hermon Atkins MacNeil”  —  & followers of ‘HermonAtkinsMacNeil.com’.   ENJOY !!

1895.   With Hamlin Garland as their guide, the pair rode by train and horse back to the south west territories of the Navajo, Hopi, (Moqui). MacNeil recalled years later, “We found Indians a plenty and perhaps because I was keenly interested in them I was in heaven and I flared to a high pitch, working from sunrise to dark. …”

“Browne painted murals for the Children’s Building at the World’s Columbian Exposition and became an instructor at the Art Institute of Chicago’s rapidly growing school.” 2

Hamilin Garland and Browne were “double” brothers-in-law having married sisters of Lorado Taft, the chief sculptor of the Exposition. Taft was the brother of both of their wives.  They all along with MacNeil were part of the Eagles Nest, a summer artist  colony in Oregon, Illinois.  Browne was a founder of the summer group.

Portrait of Charles F. Browne by H. A. MacNeil 1894. Art Institute of Chicago. [Signed on pedestal; “MacNeil ’94” / “American Art Bronze Foundry. J. Berchem. / Chicago”] 1

The adventure in the Summer of 1895 shaped the lives of all three men, but especially MacNeil who evolved an enduring interest in the Native American Indian as a subject of Beaux Arts sculpture.  

The dating of the bust of C. F. Browne precedes their venture to the Southwest Territory but documents the shared years of their early careers in the 19th century.  

Writing in 1943, MacNeil recalls these years in Chicago:

“I took a small studio in Chicago and tried to see if I could make a go of it. C. F. Browne, painter, was also stranded there and I invited him to share a studio with me. During that year (evenings) I was asked to teach sculpture and drawing in the school of the Art Institute and also had the good fortune to have four bas-reliefs to do illustrating the life of Pere Marquette.”  [ MacNeil, Autobiography

MacNeil’s four bas-reliefs of the life of Pere Marquette still make frame the four-door entrance of the building

The Marquette Building panels after cleaning efforts several years ago sparkle with history and beauty at the 140 South Dearborn Street entrance.

Chicago Architecture celebrated the building renovation and mentioned the 126 year old sculpture panels”

“At the main entrance are four bronze relief sculptures by Hermon A. MacNeil illustrating Father Marquette and Louis Joliet’s travels. They depict the pair launching their canoes, meeting Native Americans, arriving at the Chicago River, and interring Marquette’s body. On the revolving doors are kick plates with tomahawks and push plates with panther heads designed by Edward Kemeys (of the Art Institute lions fame). The vestibule features French and Catholic motifs like fleurs-de-lis and the cross.” 

~ ~ ~ ~  Chicago Art Institute Notations for this work ~ ~ ~ ~

Portrait of Charles F. Browne by H. A. MacNeil 1894.

Portrait of Charles Francis Browne.  Date: 1894
Artist: Hermon Atkins MacNeil.  American, 1866–1947
ABOUT THIS ARTWORK:  Currently Off View

SOURCES:

  1. Art Institute of Chicago. Portrait of Charles Frances Brown by Hermon MacNeil.    https://www.artic.edu/artworks/102974/portrait-of-charles-francis-browne
  2. See Also:  M Christine Schwartz Collection.  https://schwartzcollection.com/artist/charles-francis-browne/

 

Related Images:

 Hermon MacNeil’s “Chief Manuelito” has returned home. He has a completely restored look and frame. 

[CLICK Next arrows below >> to View 10 more Photos]

Manuelito-0-native-American-plaster-sculpture-after-conservation-768x1024

Image 1 of 10

MacNeil’s original 1895 Chief Manuelito as he rested above the doors of C.N. Cotton’s Trading Post in Gallup, New Mexico

During his 127 years of standing in Gallup, New Mexico, MacNeil’s 8’4″  cement constructed “Chief” was: 

Chief Manuelito of the Navajo (circa 2003)

  • Commissioned by trader, C. N. Cotton,
  • Sculpted under a tent cover in the desert,
  • Sculpted of cement,
  • Built around a wood and wire armature,
  • Wrapped in the colors of the Chief’s blanket,
  • Standing above the entrance of the trading post,
  • Weather-beaten,
  • Sun-baked,
  • Often repainted,  
  • Moved awkwardly,
  • Visited by Navajo Elders and young children,
  • Becoming an icon of the Navajo people,
  • Hidden from sale to a grocery conglomerate,
  • Stored in a warehouse by the Cotton family,
  • Donated to McKinley County, N.M. at age 115 years,
  • Approved for restoration with County funds,
  • Professionally restored by EVERGREENE Architectural Arts,
  • The new centerpiece of the Courthouse Annex,
  • Given a new century as an “Icon” on the people of Gallop, N.M. 

    Evergreene Arts employee patiently restoring Hermon MacNeil’s 1895 desert figure of Chief Manuelito.

    MacNeil’s “Chief Manuelito of the Navajo” as restored by McKinley County for new Courthouse Annex.

MacNeil sculpted a cement statue of Chief Manuelito for trader C. N. Cotton under a tent in the dessert. His subsequent sculptures of Native Americans after that summer of 1895 continued his cultural interest.  That fascination began with his friendship and sculpting of Black Pipe, the Sioux warrior. He first met Black Pipe at the Buffalo Bill Wild West Show at the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893.  The Sioux modeled for MacNeil and later worked in his studio for over a year before MacNeil’s trip with Garland.

AN AMAZING STORY OF RESTORATION:

EVERGREENE Architectural Arts of Brooklyn N.Y. is the enterprise that restored this piece.  Their story of this project with photos of the elements of the project are duplicated here from their website. 1


Chief Manuelito Sculpture

City Hall, Gallup, NM

Chief Manuelito served as an important Navajo leader in the mid-19th century against the encroachment of the U. S. Government. Kit Carson’s scorched earth campaign left many native people starving though until they were forced to turn themselves in. Throughout this period, Manuelito led attacks and remained among the last to surrender. He remained a popular leader, advocating for perseverance in the native culture and advancement through education. He is represented here by the artist Hermon Atkins MacNeil, who created several other notable sculptures of Native American subjects and themes.

The Chief Manuelito sculpture was created using wood, plaster, and paint. Past cleaning efforts had caused significant damage. Cracks in the gypsum and plaster layers were associated with the movement of the wooden armature. The sculpture had areas of loss, and areas of visible previous repairs.

We were contracted to perform the sculptures’s plaster and paint conservation treatment. After the condition assessment, paint samples were collected and investigated to develop the earliest color compositions, likely paint scheme, and pattern of the blanket. Treatment of the sculpture itself proceeded in three parts: structural stabilization and integration of new base and support components, consolidation and repair of deteriorated decorative plasterwork, and paint removal along with repainting where needed. We also provided guidance for the display of the sculpture, and a maintenance plan for its continued preservation.  SOURCE: EVERGREENE Architectural Arts


FOOTNOTES:

  1. Restorationhttps://evergreene.com/projects/chief-manuelito-sculpture/
  2. History of Manuelito, Navajo Chief.  Read more at: https://www.aaanativearts.com/manuelitio-navajo

Archive for October, 2011 posting on Manuelito’s return

GOOD NEWS !   SURPRISE ~ Hermon MacNeil’s Chief Manuelito is back!

Yesterday’s post about MacNeil and Manuelito generated considerable interest and news from Gallup, NM.

Carolyn Milligan saw our Native American Day story and responded:

“The restored Manuelito has been installed.  Early tomorrow I’ll see and visit him. There are a few details to conclude but I will send you images of the restoration. Manuelito[‘s]  dignity and presence have been skillfully restored. You will be pleased with the result.”   … Give me a few days to reply to you and to send you images of Manuelito installed in his new location. You will then have before and after images of Manuelito to include on your website.

Artist Julian Scott’s portrait of Manuelito‑ Chief of the Navajos  [Source: americangallery.wordpress.com]

In his seventy-five years of life, the Chief was driven, accused, abused, enraged, betrayed, wise, proud and a thousand other emotions that a leader might feel in a war of cultures.  All these experiences exacted a price from his life and energy.   

Harrison Lapahle’s website offers a brief history of Manuelito.  He describes the warrior’s closing years with a sorrow and painful candor that recalls the similar sorrow of his Navajo Nation. 

“He spent the last ten years of his life unhappy, certain that he had done the wrong thing by encouraging education, and by taking back all the livestock stolen by the young raiders of the tribe. Whisky was small comfort for his misery, but he drank it anyway. All around him his people still believed his words “Education is the ladder,” and they sent more and more of their children to school. They followed Manuelito even though he refused to lead them any longer.

A delegation of Navajo representatives who traveled to Washington, D.C., in 1874 to discuss the provisions of the 1868 treaty with President Ulysses S. Grant. The delegation consisted of (left to right, front row): Carnero Mucho, Mariano, Juanita (Manuelito’s wife), Manuelito, Manuelito Segundo, and Tiene-su-se Standing: “Wild” Hank Sharp (Anglo), Ganado Mucho, Barbas Hueros, Agent Arny, Kentucky Mountain Bill (Anglo), Cabra Negra, Cayatanita, Narbona Primero, and Jesus Arviso, interpreter.

He was a disheartened man, seventy-five years old in 1893, when he became very ill. Measles and then pneumonia brought the weakened old man to his deathbed.

In his fever, the years seemed to fade as he watched the sunlight play in small patches on the hogan wall. He saw the faces around him, his friends and family. He thought he heard Zarcillos Largos say, “Come, on the path of beauty you will restore your strength.” Manuelito closed his eyes in peace.

His death saddened many Navajos who had found strength in his strength. But his life had given his people a new trail to follow, and they walked it proudly, as Manuelito had walked.”  [ http://www.lapahie.com/manuelito.cfm ]

A wonderful surprise!  We await the return of the Chief to Gallup.

Seeing Chief Manuelito with his ‘dignity’ back, will prepare us all for the 21st Century.   

Uncle Hermon would smile.

 
 
 
NOTES:
  1. History of Manuelito, Navajo Chief.  Read more at: https://www.aaanativearts.com/manuelitio-navajo
  2. Navajo Chief Manuelito (1818–1893) was one of the principal war chiefs of the Diné people before, during and after the Long Walk Period. His name means Little Manuel in Spanish.
  3. As any Navajo, he was known by different names depending upon context. He was known as Ashkii Diyinii (Holy Boy), Dahaana Baadaané (Son-in-Law of Late Texan), Hastiin Chʼilhaajiní (“Black Weeds”) and as Nabááh Jiłtʼaa (War Chief, or Warrior Grabbed Enemy) to other Diné. After his first battle at age 17, he was given the name Hashkeh Naabaah, meaning Angry Warrior.
  4. Read more at: https://www.aaanativearts.com/manuelitio-navajo
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Related Images:

Categories : Location, New Mexico, Statue
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ART OF ALL ARTS – (ARS ARTIUM OMNIUM) ~ Saint Louis Art Museum ~ MacNeil’s Center Panel above the Main Entrance

“ART OF ALL ARTS”

was Hermon A. MacNeil’s Centerpiece panel above the entrance to the Museum of Fine Arts at the

1904 St. Louis World’s Fair.
In 1913 a permanent reconstruction was made as the

Saint Louis Art Museum.

“Dedicated to Art and Free to All”

The SLAM Website comments: “Ironically, the most inconspicuously placed of MacNeil’s sculptures for the fair has become his most enduring contribution to the Art Museum. Ars Artium Omnium, or The Art of All Arts, is a series of three panels above the doorways of the Museum’s north facade. Originally crafted in plaster, it was later carved in stone and given a gold mosaic background thanks to funds provided by the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company of 1913.” [https://www.slam.org/blog/the-art-of-all-arts/ ]

 

The MacNeil sculpture above the main entrance of the Saint Louis Art Museum is a fine example of the Beaux Arts style of World Fairs of this era. (http://www.slam.org/).

 

The Figure of Beauty is enshrined in the center panel is adored by the figures in the other panels left and right.

The Saint Louis Art Museum website states in Collections, St. Louis Connections :

Hermon A. MacNeil (circa 1907)

Hermon A. MacNeil was an up-and-coming younger American sculptor at the time of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in 1904. At the fair, his Fountain of Liberty and four other sculpture groups were placed along the Main Cascade. Three additional MacNeil works were much admired inside the Fines Arts Palace, now known as the Saint Louis Art Museum’s Sculpture Hall.

Ironically, the most inconspicuously placed of MacNeil’s sculptures for the fair has become his most enduring contribution to the Art Museum. Ars Artium Omnium, or The Art of All Arts, is a series of three panels above the doorways of the Museum’s north facade. Originally crafted in plaster, it was later carved in stone and given a gold mosaic background thanks to funds provided by the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company of 1913.

In the right hand-panel the figures of architecture and the allied arts; Ceramic and the kneeling figure typifying the discovery of the beauty from the earth.

Hermon A. MacNeil, American (1866-1947); Ars Artium Omnium (The Art of All Arts), 1914; stone relief panels with gold mosaic; Saint Louis Art Museum, Gift of Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company 158:1913

Ars Artium Omnium draws from a familiar series of motifs based on ancient and Renaissance art. In MacNeil’s own words:

In regard to an interpretation of the bas-relief of the facade of the City Art Museum, the attempt was made to produce a figure of beauty, as the central figure in the milled panel – “an apotheosis” – if you will, enshrined. On either side of her (is) St. Louis – with the city seal – out of her abundance, paying homage to the beauty… On the right, you have allegorical figures representing Sculpture, Painting, Music, and the fourth figure introduced (that could) go by any name… On the opposite side are the figures of architecture and the allied arts; Ceramic and the kneeling figure typifying the discovery of the beauty oftentimes dug from the earth that has been produced in past ages. You will notice in the grouping (that) the two side panels lead toward the central figure.

“Dedicated to Art and Free to All” are the words above MacNeil’s three Panels at Saint Louis Art Museum entrance

Related posts:

  1. MacNeil Sculpture “Meets Me in St. Louis” (7) On a recent trip to Saint Louis, Missouri to visit…
  2. Expositions and World’s Fairs ~ Hermon A. MacNeil (7) The Eighteenth, Nineteenth and Twentieth centuries were filled with hundreds…
  3. 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition ~ ~ Saint Louis World’s Fair (7)   The 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition ~ St. Louis World’s…
  4. SUPREME COURT – Arrival at last! (6) “Slow but steady wins the race.”  So said Aesop in…
  5. “Jo and Hermon” ~~ The Wanderer and The Monument Maker ~~ Story # 2: MacNeil Month 2021 ~~ (6) ~ JO Davidson  ~ Adventurer  ~ ~ Hermon MacNeil ~ .
 

Related Images:

Judge Thomas Burke Monument, Seattle, Washington by Hermon A. MacNeil


1930 ~ Judge Thomas Burke Memorial by MacNeil

In February 1886, Judge Thomas Burke addressed an angry mob rioting against Chinese immigrants. 

(The Judge’s public appeal occurred in the same year that MacNeil was being born over 3,000 miles away in Everett, Massachusetts), [ 135 years later, Anti-Asian bigotry and Violence against Asians appear to be nothing new . ]

“Judge Thomas Burke played a key role in calming Seattle during the anti-Chinese riots, which occurred in February 1886. Addressing a hostile audience, Burke called upon his considerable stump speaking abilities — one commentator said the Burke “had the golden gift of eloquence which has been likened to that of Patrick Henry” — to point out that minority rights must be respected. Burke also told his listeners that they should be concerned with the city’s reputation. The riots were settled by cooler heads and by the intervention of the 14th U.S. Infantry.” [Source: Thomas Burke (railroad builder)]

Forty-four years later,

Hermon A. MacNeil

was commissioned to sculpt a fitting memorial to this heroic, civic pioneer of Seattle, Washington. 

The Memorial to Judge Thomas Burke (designed in partnership with famous architect Carl F. Gould* also an 1898-1903 student at École des Beaux Arts in Paris) exhibits MacNeil’s classic Beaux Arts design and allegorical figures. 

Beneath the bronze bas relief of  Burke’s profile, the engraved stone pilaster  reads:  “Patriot, Jurist, Orator, Friend, Patron of Education, First of every Movement for the Advancement of the City and State, Seattle’s Foremost and Best Beloved Citizen.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Judge Thomas Burke

1930 ~  Thomas Burke

          — Remembered as a Railroad Builder

“Burke came to Seattle in 1875 and formed a law partnership with John J. McGilvra; he soon married McGilvra’s daughter Caroline.[2] He established himself as a civic activist: one of his first projects was to raise funds for a planked walkway from roughly the corner of First and Pike (now site of Pike Place Market) through Belltown to Lake Union.[7]

Cartoon of Thomas Burke, railroad man

He served as probate judge 1876-1880[8] and as chief justice of the Washington Territorial Supreme Court in 1888.[3]

“Irish as a clay pipe,”[9] and well liked by early Seattle’s largely Irish working class, as a lawyer Burke was well known for collecting large fees from his wealthy clients and providing free legal services for the poor.  [Source: Thomas Burke (railroad builder)]

With a open-heart for the poor and immigrants, Thomas Burke rose not only in the legal profession, but also as a probate judge and later Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Washington Territory.  He remained a civic and national leader until his dying breathe at age 76.

“Thomas Burke collapsed on December 4, 1925, while addressing the board of the Carnegie Endowment in New York City. Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler, president of Columbia University, caught him as he fell. He wrote that Burke died “in the midst of an eloquent and unfinished sentence which expressed the high ideals of international conduct.”  [Source: Thomas Burke (railroad builder)]

Thomas Burke – – – A man well remembered (Obituary HERE)

Hermon MacNeil – – – A Sculptor of Memorials

Related posts:

  1. MacNeil’s ~ Thomas Burke Monument ~ 1929 (6)   Judge Thomas Burke Monument Seattle, Washington ~ Volunteer Park…
  2. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg ~~~ has DIED this evening! (5) Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died.  She was the first Jewish…
  3. Happy Birthday Mr. Lincoln! ~ MacNeil’s Sculpture Released from Vault ~ MacNeil Month #4 (4)   Abe Lincoln will be a little late for his…
  4. Presidents Day 2020 ~~ MacNeil Month ~~ Wm. McKinley ~~ Abe Lincoln ~~ Geo. Washington ~~ “THEY ARE ALL THERE” — H.A MacNeil’s Sculptures of 3 Presidents ~~ (4)  “They are still there” celebrates several re-visits and discoveries of…
  5. “Confederate Defenders Monument” Spray Painted on May 30, 2020. (4)     May 30, 2020; Six Weeks ago the “Confederate…
  6. “MacNeil Medallion” generates new Photos of Flushing’s Lady Liberty (4) In Flushing, New York, The World War Monument by Hermon…

Related Images:

Hermon MacNeil sculpted this bust of Dwight L. Moody a century ago during the Flu Pandemic of 1919.   

One hundred years later (In 2019), I visited that MacNeil work in Sage Chapel on site at the Moody’s Northfield Seminary

The photo below records that visit.

Dwight L. Moody by Hermon MacNeil (1919). The century-old work rests Sage Chapel on site at the Moody’s Northfield Seminary. 

 

 

 

 

Click HERE for: Our first Discovery of Hermon MacNeil’s bronze bust of Evangelist Dwight L. Moody (1920) ~ “We Found It, Uncle Hermon!”

On June 6, 1919, Northfield paid Honors to Moody at the 40th Anniversary Celebration of Founder’s Day in East Northfield, Mass. 

 The  four days of celebration included:

  • A Reception at the home of Principal C. E. Dickerson, Tuesday evening, marked the close of the commencement exercises and celebration of the 40th anniversary of the funding of Northfield Seminary. 
  • The Reunion of nearly five hundred former students and friends returned to Northfield.
  • The occasion honored the founder, Dwight L. Moody.
  • Moody’s youngest granddaughter, Margaret Moody, unveiled the portrait bust by pulling the draping off of her grandfather’s bronze likeness. 
  • Little Margaret is the daughter of  Chaplain Paul D. Moody, son of D. L. Moody and Head of Chaplains for the Allied Expeditionary Force (A.E.F).  
  • The bust is the gift of the alumnae and has graced Sage Memorial Chapel for over a century. 
  • Hermon MacNeil of New York sculpted the bust from a pencil drawing he made of Mr. Moody when the evangelist was in the vigor of his powers and from a death mask provided by the school.
  • MacNeil made the sketches at The Chicago World’s Fair of 1893. Moody organized  Sunday worship services held in the stadium built by William Cody for his “Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show.” NO SUNDAY SHOWS were allowed at the Fair.  So, Moody rented it from Cody on Sundays and packed it with fair attenders and local pastors and their congregationschurch
  • It was presented by Mrs. Helen M. Williams of New York City, President of the board of trustees of the Northfield schools.  Another token of the esteem in which Northfield graduates hold their alma mater was the gift of $600 from the class of 1914.

This digital file of the article from the September 1919 issue of the Northfield Alumnae Chronicle is a treasure trove of background information.

  1. The bust was a gift of the Alumnae Association. Many small donations.
  2. Johnson’s presentation speech cites conversations with MacNeil. It is a wonderful piece of Northfield history and affection for Mr. Moody 20 years after his death. .
  3. MacNeil attended one of D. L. Moody’s Meetings in Chicago ( MacNeil was there between 1890-95).
  4. MacNeil made a hasty sketch of Moody at that meeting. He kept his sketch for years. 
  5. MacNeil created the bust of Moody and afterward told the alumnae (Mrs. Johnson (?)) the story of making the sketch.
  6. The bust was presented at a service in Sage Chapel.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1919Jun7-RDC-MoodyBust

 

SOURCES:

  1. Lost New England (retrieved 4-17-2021) [https://lostnewengland.com/category/massachusetts/northfield-massachusetts/]
    East Northfield, Mass. June 6, (1919)
  2. ROCHESTER DEMOCRAT AND CHRONICLE.  Saturday, June 7, 1919

 

Related Images:

AT  LAST,

the UNVEILING of the

75-YEAR-OLD

PORTRAIT BUST OF

HERMON A. MACNEIL

BY Jo Davidson

ON THIS THE 155TH ANNIVERSARY OF  MacNEIL’s  BIRTH

As was Jo’s custom, the front plate is signed by the sitter, H.A.MacNeil.

The back is signed by the sculptor, as hundreds of such portrait busts

all over the United States and the world

bear the same signature of this sculptor and a date,

Jo Davidson 1945

Uncle Hermon A. MacNeil

has come home

 to this his website,

 TODAY 

February 27, 2021

the 155th Anniversary of his Birth

on February 27, 1866.

 ~. ~. ~. ~. ~. ~. ~. ~. ~. ~. ~. ~

I’ve told four “Hermon & Jo” Stories in MacNeil Month 2021

Here’s the fifth one …

Early in 1945…

Jo Davidson

went back to College Point and the Studio of

 Hermon A. MacNeil

where Jo first learned studio work

from the atlier of Hermon MacNeil,

with Henri Crenier and John Gregory 

teasing him mercilessly as the studio boy

While Hermon MacNeil showed Jo through

the menial chores of the studio,

how to work clay, build an armature, make a mold,

and see the stages of making a plaster model

to become a piece that will be cast in bronze.

And thereby flame Jo’s natural talent & burning desire

to become a  sculptor.

And through his gentle personality and kindness,

MacNeil showed Jo respect

and filled some of Jo’s early void of approval

being a FATHER FIGURE unlike Jo’s own Father,

and MacNeil also affirmed Jo’s early exhibit FIGURE of

“David”, the Jewish Boy, fighting an invisible GOLIATH.

And then decades later when

Jo Davidson’s fame and career

had eclipsed even that of MacNeil

or any of his altier assistantsJohn Gregory or Henri Crenier

Jo chose to return to honor his first teacher

by sculpting him in clay

and immortalizing him in BRONZE.

AND NOW WE KNOW, THAT IS JUST WHAT

HE DID !

This bust is Just Gorgeous
An amazing piece and
a more amazing discovery —
for me and this website 
after being out of view
for over 70 years.
 
We  just  Love  IT !  
[Dan Neil Leininger: webmaster]
 

 

 
JO DAVIDSON’S LETTER OF SYMPATHY
  • On Nov. 6, 1947. Jo sent letter of sympathy to Cecelia MacNeil, Hermon’s widow expressing his heartbreak at Hermon’s passing
 
INTERESTING FACTS in this letter:
  • Jo Davidson made this sculpture in the year 1945.
  • He shares his heartbreak over the death.
  • He remembers Hermon’s happiness
  • He will exhibit the bust for the Art World to see & remember
  • He wants Cecelia to come the Exhibition and see the bust.
  • Jo and Flo invited Cecelia to their home for her to visit.
Cecelia was an RN
 
— an Army Nurse during WW I
She nursed Carol Brooks until she died
on July 22, 1944.
 
She nursed Hermon as well four years later until he died
on October 2, 1947.
 
 
 PERSONAL FACTS:
  • I am DANIEL NEIL LEININGER. My middle name comes from  my mother’s maiden name — McNeil.
  • I was born in 1945 the same year this bust was made.

    (June 30, 1945 Daniel Neil Leininger is born in Saint Louis, Missouri)
  • I am the same age as the bust. (just not as good looking)!
  • I was 27 months-old when Hermon died.  I never saw Hermon MacNeil’s face until this BUST arrived.
 
 
Curious QUESTIONs: 
  1. SO did JO make this portrait Bust of HERMON in Jan to April 1945, or NOV-DEC, 1945?
  2. Before or after his 2nd Heart attack in San Francisco?
 
 
 TIMELINE around Jo’s Bust of
 
Hermon MacNeil 
 
TIMELINE of Events when Bust was made:
SourceBetween Sittings … pp. 344-346. (Events from Jo’s narrative. Some public dates filled in)
  • April 12, 1945  Franklin D. Roosevelt died. Jo got the call at Lahaska that afternoon. Jo had known FDR since 1933 when he sculpted the first bust of him White House.  He sculpted two inaugural Medals for FDR.
  • April 18, 1945  Ernie Pyle killed in action.  Jo made his bust in 1942
  • April 22, 1945  Jo Davidson and Florence travel (fly) to Los Angeles., Says he is  exhausted. Jo is distressed self-dosing on nitroglycerin tablets
  • April 24, 1945  Jo Davidson has a 2nd heart attack on the opening evening of the United Nations Conference. 
  • April 25, 1945 Jo Davidson is in St. Mary”s Hospital in San Francisco under an oxygen tent.
  • April 25, 1945 to June 26, 1945 — United Nations Organizational Conference in San Francisco
  • Aug. 14, 1945  Florence tells Jo of Victory-in-Japan Day news report on radio in while he remains in hospital.
  • Sept. – Oct. 1945  For the next Two months Jo was recouping at the Ranch of Ralph Stagpole in Cloverdale CA.  The Stagpoles took in Jo, his nurse, and Florence and helped him get back to health.
  • Oct. 1945. Jo and Flossie returned to their home in Lahaska, NY
  • Nov. 6, 1947. Jo sends letter of sympathy to Cecelia MacNeil, Hermon’s widow expressing his heart break at Hermon’s passing
  • Oct. 2, 1947  DEATH:  Hermon Atkins MacNeil dies at his home in College Point.
  • Nov. 25, 1947 BUST EXHIBITED  ~~ National Institute of Arts and Letters – Retrospective Exhibition of Jo Davidson’s Work.  This bust was a part of that Exhibition
  • 1951  Jo Davidson’s health continues to deteriorate
  • 1951  Jo’s friends Andre Gide & Robert Flaherty died … and Sinclair Lewis
  • Jan. 2, 1952  Jo Davidson dies at his home in Becheron, France.
FYI
 I have ordered a plain black wooden pillar stand (30′ X 12″ X 12″).   It will offer a fitting display for this wonderful tribute to
Hermon A. MacNeil (1866-1947)
Beaux Arts sculptor of Indians and Monuments
 
 
 
 

HERMON MacNEIL AS HE APPEARED ABOUT 1945

Hermon Atkins MacNeil ~ About 1945 ~ when Jo Davidson sculpted him.  Seated outside of his studio in College Point, Queens, NYC. [ Credit: Kenilworth Historical Society donated by Joel Rosenkranz of Conner – Rosenkranz, LLC. ]

 

Related Images:

~~ MacNeil Month – February 27, 2021 ~~

FIFTH Story of “Hermon & Jo” will celebrate the

155th Anniversary of Hermon’s Birth on

February 27th  1866

~~ With the presentation of Jo Davidson’s

tribute to his teacher

Jo’s   bronze portrait bust of

Hermon A. MacNeil

Right HERE

Related Images:

WHAT YOU FIND HERE.

Here is ONE place to go to see sculpture of Hermon A. MacNeil & his students. Located in cities from east to west coast, found indoors and out, public and private, these creations point us toward the history and values that root Americans.

Daniel Neil Leininger ~ HAMacNeil@gmail.com
Hosting & Tech Support: Leiturgia Communications, Inc.           WATCH US GROW

WE DESIRE YOUR DIGITAL PHOTOS – Suggestions

1. Take digital photos of the work from all angles, including setting.
2. Take close up photos of details that you like
3. Look for MacNeil’s signature. Photograph it too! See examples above.
4. Please, include a photo of you & others beside the work.
5. Tell your story of adventure. It adds personal interest.
6. Send photos to ~ Webmaster at: HAMacNeil@gmail.com