WELCOME to the “Hermon A. MacNeil” — Virtual Gallery & Museum !

~ This Gallery celebrates Hermon Atkins MacNeil, American sculptor of the Beaux Arts School. MacNeil led a generation of sculptors in capturing many fading Native American images and American history in the realism of this classic style.

~ World’s Fairs, statues, public monuments, coins, and buildings across to country. Hot-links (on the lower right) lead to photos & info of works by MacNeil.

~ Hundreds of stories and photos posted here form this virtual MacNeil Gallery of works all across the U.S.A.  New York to New Mexico — Oregon to South Carolina.

~ 2016 marked the 150th Anniversary of Hermon MacNeil’s birth on February 27,

Take a Virtual Journey

This website seeks to transport you through miles and years with a few quick clicks of a mouse or keyboard or finger swipes on an iPad.

Perhaps you walk or drive by one of MacNeil's many sculptures daily. Here you can gain awareness of this artist and his works.

For over one hundred years his sculptures have graced our parks, boulevards, and parkways; buildings, memorials, and gardens; campuses, capitols, and civic centers; museums, coinage, and private collections.

Maybe there are some near you!

Archive for Carol Brooks MacNeil

So Says the Greeting on this 104 year-old Christmas Card from the Hermon MacNeil Studio on College Point, Queens, New York.

 A photo of the MacNeil Studio on College Point, holly sprigs and a Doll-faced Christmas bell, these things grace the face of this holiday greeting card.

The back shows an addressee and a College Point postmark for Dec 24, 1912 with a cancellation on a 1 cent George Washington postage stamp.  Perhaps these cards were available to MacNeil’s students at the Pratt Institute as Seasons greetings. 

A publishers mark, “F. Hettling, Pub.” is listed on the bottom front in very small print.  

The addressee (Miss Jule Cox, 285 Carlton Ave, Brooklyn, New York) brings up a residence about 12 blocks from the Pratt Institute where MacNeil was an instructor for many years.  (Thus our ‘student theory’ on this Christmas note.  The signature is not readily decipherable (from The Deachins?).  All is written in black ink with a fountain pen.  — All in all, its a curious relic from a century ago.

The photo of the studio was used in other Christmas cards and newspaper articles about the MacNeil sculptors.

Hermon MacNeil built his Studio building out of stones.  These he gathered from the shoreline and bottom on the East River sound behind the studio.  Being the son and grandson of builders, he was familiar with hand labor, construction and masonry.  

The studio was bathed in natural light through skylights and featuresd a section where Carol Brooks MacNeil (Carrie) did her sculpture work as well.

This curious Item came up as an eBay offering during 2016.  SO guess who wanted it?  

Carol Brooks MacNeil - 1907 - Twelve years after her marriage to Hermon

Carol Brooks MacNeil – 1907 – Twelve years after her marriage to Hermon

H.A.MacNeil ~1895 sketch - Chicago-Sun

H.A.MacNeil ~1895 sketch – The Sun (New York City)

On Christmas Day one dozen decades ago, Hermon A. MacNeil and Carol Louise Brooks were married in Chicago, Illinois.  The pair were both sculptors who met while working on the World’s Colombian Exposition of 1893, better known as the Chicago World’s Fair.

Carol was a student of Lorado Taft and became one of the White Rabbits. These female sculptors were hired (commissioned) to help finish the 100’s of sculptures needed to finish the buildings, fountains, arcades, for the White City of the Chicago Worlds Fair.  

Previous postings celebrate this MacNeil-Brooks Wedding:

  1. Christmas Day Wedding for Two Young Sculptors! Hermon Atkins MacNeil and Carol Louise Brooks

  2. “The Most Happy Young Man I Know” ~ Hermon A. MacNeil ~ Success & Marriage!
  3. Christmas Day Wedding for Two Young Sculptors! Hermon Atkins MacNeil and Carol Louise Brooks

  4. MacNeil’s Chicago Wedding
Eda Lord's Chicago World's Fair Ticket from 'Chicago Day.' Her great-great grandson, Jim Dixon found it an a box of her memobilia from the era when she bought her MacNeil sculpture.

Eda Lord’s Chicago World’s Fair Ticket from ‘Chicago Day.’ (Her great-great grandson, Jim Dixon found it an a box of her memobilia from the era when she bought her MacNeil sculpture.)

I sit here in Chicago during this Christmas Season, imagining a Christmas wedding ceremony one hundred and nineteen years ago.

~

On Christmas Eve day in 1895, Hermon Atkins MacNeil and Carol Louise Brooks purchased a Cook County license to solemnize their marriage. The very next day, Christmas 1895, they shared their vows before God and a Congregational minister named, Edward F. Williams, here in Chicago.  The record looks like this:

Marriage License of Hermon Atkins MacNeil and Carol Louise Brooks issued on December 24th, 1895 and completed on Christmas Day 1895 by Rev. Edward F. Williams, Congregational Minister.

Marriage License of Hermon Atkins MacNeil and Carol Louise Brooks issued on December 24th, 1895 and completed on Christmas Day 1895 by Rev. Edward F. Williams, Congregational Minister.

Both Hermon and Carol were sculptors. Hermon had completed 4 bronze relief sculpture panels for the new Marquette Building. They had fellow friends among the art community, sculptor colleagues from the  Chicago World’s Fair, students and teachers from the Art Institute of Chicago, and “White Rabbits” team of women sculptors.  We don’t have any record of who might have witnessed their nuptials.

~

But it was Christmas Day, a time when families gather.  Hermon’s family was far away in Massachusetts. Carol’s was born in Chicago and studied there at the Art Institute with Lorado Taft working on the 1893 Worlds Fair with her “White Rabbit” colleagues. Perhaps some friends or family were present or even hosted some wedding celebration. Her parents were close enough to be present, but no evidence suggests that.  It appears to have been a quick, quiet, modest ceremony.  The less than a one-day turn around on their marriage license would support that.  In addition, we know that they sailed a week later for Rome and Hermon’s Roman Reinhart Scholarship studies there. A  December 22, 1895 – New York Sun, article (CLICK HERE) supports that as well as a letter from Amy Ardis Bradley [ CLICK for MORE ]

~

New York Sun December 22, 1895 "The Reinhart Prize Winner ~ Hermon Atkins Macneil of Chicago"

New York Sun December 22, 1895 “The Reinhart Prize Winner ~ Hermon Atkins Macneil of Chicago”

The officiating minister, Rev. Edward (Franklin) Williams appears to have been a prominent clergy described as “a Congregational minister, educator, field agent for the United States Christian Commission, missionary, and writer.” Source: Edward Franklin Williams papers, Amistad Research Center at Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana )  He wrote Carol’s name as “Carrie” in his handwritten certification on the bottom of the license.  She went by ‘Carrie’ among her friends.

 ~

Whether Rev. Williams considered her a ‘friend’ we do not know.  Philip Khopf, the Cook County clerk, wrote ‘Carol’ in the top portion of the certificate.  Rev. Williams could have copied “Carol” from the official record above, but chose to use ‘Carrie’ instead.  The license lists Carol as being 24 years of age and Hermon as 29.  We know that the minister was 63 years of age when he led their ceremony.  Until 1891 he was pastor of the South Congregational Church, in suburban Chicago.  For health reasons he had “an extended stay abroad (June, 1891 to July, 1893), primarily in Germany, where he pursued studies in Berlin.” Returning to Chicago he studied and lectured at Chicago Theological Seminary during 1894.

 ~

Whether Rev. Williams had some previous knowledge with Carrie and Hermon or was a friend of the family, is uncertain.  He seemed very connected to the Chicago community and many of the potential benefactors of the arts. At a minimum, his use of “Carrie” seems to indicate a ‘cordial’ style of ministry and interaction. It also seems consistent with his servant-attitude toward needs of the soldiers and wounded he encountered during the Civil War.

~

CLICK HERE for more Links and info about Hermon and Carrie’s marriage in 1895:

~

More biographical information on Rev. Williams is offered below.

Williams, Edward Franklin (1832-1919)

 Historical Note: Edward Franklin Williams was a Congregational minister, educator, field agent for the United States Christian Commission, missionary, and writer.  Edward Franklin Williams was born in Massachusetts in 1832, the son of Delilah Morse Williams and George Williams. Williams attended Yale University from 1852 to 1856, and he continued to earn an advanced degree from Yale. He later attended the Princeton Theological Seminary, where he graduated and earned his license to preach in 1861.Williams was exempt from the draft due to a tubercular condition in his lungs, and thus he did not fight in the Civil War. In April 1863, Williams received a commission as a field agent for the United States Christian Commission. With the Commission, he served two and a half years in the armies of the Potomac and the James.After the war, Williams was sent as principal to begin was became the Lookout Mountain Educational Institutions in Chattanooga, Tennessee. In 1867, Williams was appointed by the American Missionary Association to teach in the Normal and Preparatory Division of what was later Howard University. He left Howard to preach at several churches in Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Illinois, and New York, ultimately serving as pastor of Tabernacle Church in Chicago and Forty-Seventh Street Congregational Church, which later became South Congregational Church, in suburban Chicago, where he served until 1891.By 1880, Williams was writing a monthly column for The Congregationalist under a pen name, “Franklin.” He continued writing for this publication until 1908. He continued as a prolific writer, particularly in the 1890s.

From 1901 to 1911 Williams served as pastor of the Evanston Ave. Congregational Church in Chicago. Williams died in 1919 in Chicago.

[ Sources: Edward Franklin Williams papers, Amistad Research Center at Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana ]

 

 

Christmas Greetings from the home of Hermon and Carol MacNeil. 

Pictured below is a tinted postcard of their studio which ajoined their home on College Point.  Beneath that you can see their actual 1922 Christmas card drawn by Hermon MacNeil for their friends.  Married on Christmas Day in 1895, this is also Hermon and Carol’s 27th Wedding Anniversary.  (CLICK for MORE)
Note how Hermon’s Christmas card sketch resembles his “Sun Vow” pair of Native Americans from a quarter century earlier. 

MERRY CHRISTMAS

from the MacNeil’s of College Point just 91 years ago.

MacNeil studio in College Point

MacNeil studio in College Point

MacNeil Christmas card

MacNeil Christmas card 1922 (photo courtesy of  – James Haas)

 In August of 1929, Hermon Atkins MacNeil sent a painting to my mother, Ollie Francis McNeil, as a wedding present.  Mother always referred to him as her “Uncle Hermon.”  Painted on an thin (acid-based) cardboard, the piece has aged badly in the eighty-eight years since MacNeil sketched and painted it in 1925.  Here is how it looked in 2010 before continual flaking and deterioration stressed it even further.

This photo from 2010 shows the un-restored landscape painted by Hermon MacNeil in 1925. Several flakes (1/2 to 3/4 of an inch) peeled off from the sky after this photo was taken. The deterioration was destroying this informal piece and suppressing its sentimental value as an MacNeil heirloom. Something had to be done to preserve it for its second century.

This photo from 2010 shows the un-restored landscape painted by Hermon MacNeil in 1925. Several flakes (1/2 to 3/4 of an inch) peeled off from the sky after this photo was taken. The deterioration was destroying this informal piece and suppressing its sentimental value as an MacNeil heirloom. Something had to be done to preserve it for its second century.

Leslie Goodwin examined the fragile conditions of MacNeil heirloom and determined that cleaning, stabilization, and repainting of broken areas could refresh the piece.

Leslie Goodwin examined the fragile conditions of the MacNeil heirloom and determined that cleaning, stabilization, and repainting of broken areas could refresh the piece.

 In August 2013, I received an enquiry on this website from an art restorer, Leslie Goodwin, in Colorado.  She had been asked by a client to evaluate another painting by MacNeil. I offered her what information I knew about Uncle Hermon’s occasional ‘dabbling in oils.’

Later, I sent the photo (at right) of the painting to Leslie.  She thought she could help to preserve this piece. I began making arrangements to mail it to her.  After receiving her address, I determined that I had travel plans that would take me within 20 miles of her studio. Coincidence?

Several weeks later, I delivered the painting, personally, to Leslie Goodwin in Colorado. She was able to carefully examine the fragile conditions of our MacNeil heirloom, firsthand. 

Leslie explained the risks and uncertainties of working with old art. She saw the necessity of stopping the rapid deterioration that recent years were adding to the ageing piece. She suggested that cleaning, stabilization, and repainting of broken areas could refresh the piece.  We both agreed that without professional TLC this MacNeil oil painting would not see a 2nd century of life.

So, carefully, she began the preservation process.  Two days later she called to say she was finished.  She was also pleased with the results.  Pictured BELOW is the resurrected look of Ollie Francis MacNeil Leininger’s wedding present from her “Uncle Hermon.”

After restoration

After restoration the cleaning of the landscape brought out hidden colors.

As I saw the results of Leslie’s work, I felt that I was seeing Mother’ s wedding present as she first saw it in 1929.  The repairs to lost portions of the sky brought the scene back together. The cleaning of the landscape brought out hidden colors that I did not see before. A vibrant freshness came out of the strokes of paint. It looked as though Uncle Hermon ‘sculpted’ in paints with a sculptor’s knife rather than an artist’s brush. And of course, that familiar signature, “H. A. MacNeil,” now jumped out of the corner with new boldness.  ”  I think even Ollie would be proud!

1929-HAM-OFMcNeil-WedGift-Note1

Hermon MacNeil’s handwritten note pencilled on the back of his landscape painting says’ “Landscape sketch by H. A. MacNeil presented to Ollie Francis MacNeil as a wedding present by her uncle. H. A. MacNeil ~~ 1929”

While the painting has some limited value, the real heirloom significance resides in the pencilled message on the back.  Hermon MacNeil’s handwritten note on the back of his landscape painting says, “Landscape sketch by H. A. MacNeil presented to Ollie Francis MacNeil as a wedding present by her uncle. H. A. MacNeil ~~ 1929″

That note confirmed several things for me!

  • Not only did mother address Hermon as “Uncle,” he considered himself to be just that to his cousin’s, (Tom McNeil’s) daughters.
  • Hermon was aware of mother’s wedding, and wanted to send a gift.
  • Hermon sent a gift made by his own hands.
  • Hermon personalized that gift with a handwritten note that included his signature – twice!
  • In addition, the timing of Hermon’s gift and note to Ollie McNeil was about 17 months after the prolonged death of Hermon’s and Carol’s only daughter, Joie Katherine MacNeil, in March 1928.  Joie, age seventeen, died in  Flushing Hospital of an infection which had been slowly draining her health since an attack of scarlet fever several years previously. She convalesced in the MacNeil home on Fifth Avenue (North boulevard), College Point.  My mother, Ollie McNeil, would have been about 2 years older than Joie MacNeil.
  • It also came 3 months after the marriage of their son Alden B. MacNeil to Irene E. Hollo on May 25, 1929.  Those nuptials were held while Hermon and Carol MacNeil were abroad in Italy and Paris from November 1928 to September 1929.
Thomas (Tom) Henry McNeil (b. 1860 - d. 1932)

Thomas (Tom) Henry McNeil (b. 1860 – d. 1932)

Hermon Atkins MacNeil (b. 1866 - d. 1947)

Hermon Atkins MacNeil (b. 1866 – d. 1947)

Hermon Atkins MacNeil (1866-1947) and Thomas Henry McNeil (1860-1932) were cousins. They shared a common grandfather, Peter McNeil (1786-1847).
Hermon is the sculptor celebrated on this website.Thomas (Tom Henry) was my grandfather. My mother, Ollie Francis McNeil, always referred to Hermon as “Uncle Hermon”. Their parents wanted her (and her sisters and brother) to do that out of respect.

Hermon was more correctly their “first cousin, once removed”.  But “Uncle” seems both easier and more respectful.  Hermon would be my “first cousin, twice removed” [ see ancestry chart below ].

HAM-THM-chartDNL

The MacNeil Cousins share a common grandfather, Peter MacNeil, who is my great-great-grandfather.

MacNeil of Barra tartan

MacNeil of Barra tartan

Tom Henry was born in Missouri, near Burdette in Bates County. He graduated from the University of Michigan.  He played football there as the first starting quarterback in consecutive seasons. He practiced as a lawyer for Kansas City Railways Company, and in later years, he was responsible for making accident reports to the Interstate Commerce Commission and the Public Service Commission of Missouri. He died in 1932.

Hermon was born in Everett (Chelsea, Malden) Mass.  In 1886 he graduated from Normal Art School in Boston (now Mass Art).  He moved to Cornell University, New York, until 1889, leaving to study in Paris as a pupil of Henri M. Chapu and Alexandre Falguière. He sculpted in Chicago from 1891-1895, at the Columbian World Exposition (1893 Chicago World’s Fair) meeting Carol Brooks (also a sculptor).  They married on Christmas Day 1895 and sailed days later for Rome (1895-99). Following another year in Paris (1899-1900), they settled in New York City building a home and studio in College Point, Long Island.  He worked and lived there until his death in 1947.

FOR MORE read:

Dan Leininger

Daniel Neil Leininger, webmaster, HermonAtkinsMacNeil.com

 

WHAT YOU FIND HERE.

Nearby or far away, there is no ONE place to go and appreciate this wide range of art pieces. Located in cities from east to west coast, found indoors and out, public and hidden, these creations point us toward the history and values in which our lives as Americans have taken root.

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WE DESIRE YOUR DIGITAL PHOTOS – Suggestions

1. Take digital photos of the entire work from several angles, including the surroundings.
2. Take close up photos of details that capture your imagination.
3. Look for MacNeil’s signature, often on bronze works. Photograph it too! See examples above.
4. Please, include a photo of yourself and/or those with you standing beside the work.
5. Add your comments or a blog of your adventure. It adds personal interest for viewers.
6. Send photos to HAMacNeil@gmail.com Contact me there with any questions. ~~ Webmaster