WELCOME to the “Hermon A. MacNeil” — Virtual Gallery & Museum !

~ This Gallery celebrates Hermon Atkins MacNeil, American sculptor of the Beaux Arts School. MacNeil led a generation of sculptors in capturing many fading Native American images and American history in the realism of this classic style.

~ World’s Fairs, statues, public monuments, coins, and buildings across to country. Hot-links (on the lower right) lead to photos & info of works by MacNeil.

~ Hundreds of stories and photos posted here form this virtual MacNeil Gallery of works all across the U.S.A.  New York to New Mexico — Oregon to South Carolina.

~ 2016 marked the 150th Anniversary of Hermon MacNeil’s birth on February 27,

Take a Virtual Journey

Since 2010 this website has transported viewers through the years and miles between 100’s of Hermon MacNeil’s statues & monuments throughout the USA.

For over one hundred years these sculptures have graced our parks, boulevards, and parkways; buildings, memorials, and gardens; campuses, capitols, and civic centers; museums, coinage, and private collections.

PERHAPS,  you walk or drive by one of his public sculptures daily. HERE, you can gain awareness of this great sculptor and his many works.  Maybe there are some near you! CHECK HERE!

Archive for Washington Park

Hermon A. MacNeil’s statue of

General George Washington

(on the reverse of this historic Arch)

stands above this

“Victory Celebration.”

Spontaneous crowds are celebrating the

ELECTION of 46th PRESIDENT of the United States,

Joseph Robinette Biden Jr.

(The “Everyday JOE” candidate.) 

& Kamala Harris

the first Woman Vice President

daughter of an Asian Indian Mother and a Jamacian Father, 

Joyous New Yorkers flocked to the historic Washington Arch to dance and shout as Joe Biden was declared the next President-elect after four days of ballot counting.

It’s An American National Block Party

Behind the scenes MacNeil’s likeness of General Washington guarded the rear flanks of the rally

MacNeil’s statue portrays General George Washington in the uniform of the Continental Army of 1775.  Also, on the back of the Arch is Alexander Sterling Calder’s accompanying statue of President Washington as 1st President and the first civilian Commander-in-Chief.

Celebrating Americans seem relieved that new leadership will deal with the following stresses of 2020:

  • Political Vitriol
  • COVID-19 PANDEMIC
  • Black Lives Matter demonstrations.
  • Weaponized Decision Folly

 

In June 2020 Vandals tossed

red paint

this MacNeil work

Both statues of George Washington suffered “red paint” vandalism during earlier demonstrations on June 29, 2020.

[ CLICK HERE for that Story ]

Photo Credit: NY Post – Stephan Jeremiah

The accompanying “George Washington as President” statue by Alexander Sterling Calder was also damaged.  They have since been cleaned.  However, such vandalism takes a toll on these century old marble art monuments.

 The Vandalism post:

Related posts:

  1. Presidents Day 2020 ~~ MacNeil Month ~~ Wm. McKinley ~~ Abe Lincoln ~~ Geo. Washington ~~ “THEY ARE ALL THERE” — H.A MacNeil’s Sculptures of 3 Presidents ~~ (10)  “They are still there” celebrates several re-visits and discoveries of…
  2. Happy Birthday Mr. Washington! ~ PART ONE ~ MacNeil Month #5 ~ The President Who would NOT be King. (9) February 22nd marks the 279th Birthday of George Washington. February…
  3. Happy (actual) Birthday, Mr. Washington! ~~~ ~~~ Visit New York City for MacNeil Month ~~~ (#8) (9) George Washington  February 22, 1732 Pictured below is Hermon A. …
  4. New York – Washington Square – Arch – (8) MacNeil’s “Washington at War” graces one side of the Arch…
  5. Washington Square – NYC – Fiction and Reality (8) Hermon A. MacNeil’s sculpture of George Washington on the Arch…
  6. Memorial Day Photo ~MacNeil’s “General George Washington” with flags (7)
Comments (0)

 “They are still there” celebrates several re-visits and discoveries of MacNeil works made in 2019. This Presidents Day we look again at:

  1. “William McKinley” statue in Columbus, Ohio.

    The Statue of Wm. McKinley stands in front of Ohio Capitol looking out over the city of Columbus. I always marvel at MacNeil’s works all over the U.S. of A.

     

  2. The “Lincoln Lawyer” of Illinois

    Image from the Re-dedication Day of Lincoln Hall at University of Illinois in Champagne-Urbana in 2012.

     

     

     

    This Lincoln Hall image was on the Tee Shirts worn by student-guides on Feb 12, 2012 for the re-opening of the renovated Hall

  3. Washington Square in New York City. 

    General George Washington with Flags (U.S. and POW/MIA) ~ Washington Arch Greenwich, NYC (Photo courtesy of: Gibson Shell – 2011)

    In NYC MacNeil’s likeness of General Washington guards the rear flanks of the Washington Arch.

     

President McKinley was assassinated at the 1902 Pan American Exposition in Buffalo, NY.  MacNeil was an exhibitor and sculpted the Award medal for that Worlds Fair.  He later was awarded the commission for this McKinley Monument at the Ohio Capitol Square in Columbus.

McKinley detail ~ foot of “Industry” – a Blacksmith.

Industry and and his youthful student – allegorical figures in the McKinley grouping.

McKinley quote after taking office in 1900.

“Prosperity” and her her understudy, “Peace”

 

 

Here are three old Photos of the McKinley Monument

Early 1900s Postcard of McKinley Monument.

McKinley grouping in front of Ohio Capitol.

MacNeil’s 1915 “Lincoln” in Lincoln Hall

The restored East Foyer of Lincoln Hall with its gilted vaulted ceiling and columns makes a dramatic setting for Hermon A. MacNeil’s bust of Abrabam Lincoln as the famed prairie lawyer who left Illinois to lead the nation through the War to preserve the Union and the succession South states.

Another of Hermon MacNeil’s “Lincoln Lawyer” was found at the Rushville (Illinois) Public Library. The happy webmaster was pleased to see it and meet the Library staff.  I am sure you recognize Abe Lincoln.  Well the guy smilin’ on the right is me, Dan Leininger [the “happy webmaster of  HAM (https://hermonatkinsmacneil.com/)

MacNeil of Barra tartan

 

 

Hermon MacNeil’s “Chief of the Multnomah” was cast in full size and half size versions.  This one was Discovered by a reader of this website several years ago in Vernon, New Jersey.  Here was a brief note that was sent to the website:

Another Chief of the Mulnomah

Another Chief of the Multnomah

I’ve been noticing a magnificent piece of the scultpture for the past few years, located in Vernon N.J. at the Minerals Spa and Resort. After closer examination I discovered it is Chief Multnomah with his arms crossed, standing on tip toes looking outward. “The coming of the white man” is the title usually ascribed to this work, but in this case the chief stands alone without his scout or assistant as pictured on your web-site. It is signed simply, H.A. Macneil S.C. 04. Just thought it was a variation of the piece that you might find interesting.I’m not really sure how long its been there, because I’m relatively new to the area. Being a sculptor myself and one that is particularly fond on the late 19th cent/early 20th cent period, with the likes of Rodin, Bayre, Dega, etc. Macneil certainly is a strong and salutory member of that period. Regards, D. Moldoff.

My response was as follows:

Dear D. L. Moldoff,

Thanks for noticing sculpture around you and sharing the information.  The ‘Chief Multnomah’ is the larger Half of H. A. MacNeil’s “The Coming of the White Man.” (COTWM). While the COTWM piece is only at the Washington Park in Portland, OR, where it was commissioned for that city.  The original plaster sculpture model is in the Poppenhusen Institute in Queens, NYC, just blocks from MacNeil’s studio.

(Click HERE ) for link to my archives of seven post on Chief of the Mulnomah.)

There are multiple castings of this single piece, the “Chief Multnomah”, possibly over 20 in total. I believe there are at lease two groupings of 12 casts and 9 casts of this statue. I have found information and location on three other ‘Multnomah’s. Plus there are many smaller (half-scale) casts of this sculpture.

Thanks again.

Dan Leininger

These are the related entries for this story. For MORE see these previous posts:

  1. Hermon MacNeil ~ Postcard ~ 2012 MacNeil Month #1 ~ “Coming of the White Man” (9)
  2. Poppenhusen Institute makes MacNeil Collection Appeal! (8)
  3. Portland – Coming of the White Man (7)
  4. “Chief of the Multnomah” ~ DO WE HAVE ONE? ~ ??????? (7)

Hermon A. MacNeil’s plaster sculpture of “George Washington”made as his studio plaster model nearly a century ago.

Recognize this Patriot?

You can HELP HIM return to College Point. 

Here are a few clues:

  1. The piece you see here is less that 1/3 the size of the actual statue (pictured below).
  2. For the last 64 years it has been in storage at a museum over 800 miles from MacNeil’s studio in College Point, Queens, NYC where it originated.
  3. Along with a dozen and a half other plaster casts from MacNeil’s studio, this stately Commander left College point after the sculptor’s death.

If the Poppenhusen Institute and Susan Brustmann, the director, have their way, this “General Washington” may spend his 2nd century as a “permanent resident” of the community where Hermon MacNeil sculpted him.

“George Washington as Commander-in Chief” ~ A recent photo of this MacNeil work that has graced the Washington Arch in Greenwich Village for the last 96 years.

 A NEW HOME at the POPPENHUSEN INSTITUTE (MORE)  is being offered just blocks down the street from where MacNeil’s hands fashioned this commemorative piece.

Susan Brustmann, director of the Institute, informs us that discussions are underway to bring these MacNeil statues home. 

For 64 years they have been in the inventory and care of a midwestern museum that has decided to de-assession the pieces.  Seldom seen, never permanently exhibited, and soon to be de-assessioned, over a dozen others may return to College Point.

But your help is needed.

YOU CAN HELP! CONTACT us at:

HAMacNeil@gmail.com

Stay tuned for updates.

Related posts:

  1. Poppenhusen Institute makes MacNeil Collection Appeal! (14.8)
  2. MacNeil Sculpture at Poppenhusen Institute (11.2)
  3. MacNeil Park – College Point, Queens, NY (17)
  4. MacNeil Postcard #3 ~ ‘From Chas. Aug 24, 1907′ (8.4)
  5. Confederate Defenders Statue – White Point Gardens & the Battery (8.6)

 

February is “MacNeil Month at HermonAtkinsMacNeil.com

Feb 27th, 2012 is the 146th Anniversary of Hermon MacNeil’s birth.

Hermon MacNeil’s “Coming of the White Man” sculpture in Portland, OR, appears to be the most popular postcard of all his statues.

"Coming of the White Man" (Postcard credit: Gibson Shell, KC MO)

Hermon A. MacNeil’s “Coming of the White Man” in Portland Oregon has an interesting story of the  boulder-like stone that forms its base.  This postcard image from Gib Shell shows the enormous granite stone on which MacNeil placed the statue.

The story, as I read it from a newspaper interview from about 1905, went like this.  MacNeil was very particular about how his sculptures were mounted. Many of them were placed on bases that he made as a special part of the piece.  The Marquette-Jolliet-Illini grouping in Chicago, the “Confederate Defenders” statue in Charleston each have stone bases with carvings, words, and art details that compliment the piece.

MacNeil wanted a stone base that fit into the wooded setting of Washington Park (Plaza Park) in Portland,Oregon.  The site for the statue, I am told, overlooks the Columbia River to the East.  The Native American pair [a Chief of the Multnomah, and the Medicine Man (scout)] look into the river valley and spy the first White explorers coming to their region.  MacNeil portrays the Chief as tall, proud, and serene, while the Medicine Man is aroused, eager, and excited.  [See: ” If MacNeil’s “Chiefs” Could Speak, What would They tell us Today? ].   

MacNeil considered the cost of shipping a stone from New York.  He decided it would cost too much.  But he knew what he wanted in a stone.  So he made a plaster model (that is what sculptors do).  The model was 1/3 the size of the stone that he wanted.  Then he shipped it with the statue to Portland.  He sent instructions that a stone be found sufficient for a base. 

When the statue arrived in Portland, Hermon came and found that no one had looked for a stone as he requested.  So he took his 1/3 plaster model, put it in a boat and traveled up the Columbia River to a granite quarry about 20 miles up river.  Leaving his plaster model in the boat, he went to the quarry and found a piece of granite sufficient to shape for a natural looking base.   Finding a suitable stone, he had it transported to a barge and them brought up the river.  At the foot of the hill where the statue was to be placed, it took a four horse team to pull the stone up the hill (this was 1904 remember).

MacNeil must have sculpted the base on site.  It bears the name of the statue and the information on the donor.  When looking at a sculpture I seldom take time to consider the base, pedestal, or the setting in which the sculptor, artist, architect may have placed it. I hope MacNeil’s story adds to your curiosity and appreciation of his work.

This photo shows the upper base of the statue as part of the casting itself with the name sculpted into the base. This sits on the boulder that MacNeil crafted for the setting from Columbis River granite. (Postcard courtesy of Gibson Shell, KC MO)


 

 

There is another “Chief of the Multnomah.”

Today I received four unsolicited photos in my website email.  Three are posted below. The only message was the words, “I need help with this.”

I responded with “What help do you need with this?”

“A Chief of the Multnomah” is silent, but If he could only speak and share his observations of 150 years with the White Man.

The one word answer came back, “Valuation.”

So, I asked for permission to post the photos on this website. I added that the photos: 

“are excellent examples of public works of HA MacNeil that are not publicized in the art world. I was not aware of this public sculpture until your inquiry.”

My responses included:

1. An explanation that I am neither an art appraiser nor an art dealer.  I also expressed curiosity as to where the statue was located in such a park-like setting.

2. I identified myself as the webmaster of HermonAtkinsMacNeil.com. I  stated that I build and maintain this website to gather information on the sculpture and life of Hermon A. MacNeil.  I stated that it has attracted people like the inquirer who wanted more information.

3. So I offered the following information: I recognize the piece in the photographs as “A Chief of the Multnomah.”  The  photo of MacNeil’s signature is very helpful. (See below). The ‘H.A. MacNeil, SC’ was his typical marking.  “SC” was his abbreviation for ‘sculptor.’  The ’04’ would indicate a completion date of ‘1904’ for the sculpture. The 4/9 would suggest this is the 4th casting of 9 castings of this piece.  There is probably a marking of RBW or “Roman Bronze Works” somewhere on the sculpture also. They were the foundry that MacNeil (and dozens of other American sculptors) used most extensively.

The signature reds: "H.A MacNeil, SC. 04" and "4/9"

4. I passed along information of a recent estate auction in Queens, NY  a where a “Chief of the Multnomah” statue was sold.  While I do not have documentation, I remembered reading a sale price somewhere in the $35,000 range. I suggested that this other piece might be one the ‘nine’ cast with this 4th-of-9 castings. See section 7 below and the links there for a bit more on that Michael Halberian Estate Sale.

5. I told how MacNeil later combined ‘Chief Multnomah  with a smaller accompanying figure of a native medicine man standing by the chief. That larger sculpture he called, “The Coming of the White Man.”  It stands in Portland, Oregon in Washington Park. See my posting at:
https://hermonatkinsmacneil.com/2010/05/17/portland-coming-of-the-white-man/  

6. I also told how the original plaster sculpture model of the “Coming of the White Man” was given by MacNeil to the Poppenhusen Institute in College Point, Queens, NYC, which is just up the street from the location of MacNeil’s studio and home (now destroyed). Here is more of the story on that:
https://hermonatkinsmacneil.com/2010/09/15/macneil-sculpture-at-poppenhusen-institute/  

"A Chief of the Multnomah" looks over the Choptank River on Maryland's Eastern Shore.

7. I then offered more about that recent estate auction featuring “A Chief of the Multnomah” (which is the right-hand half of the “Coming of the White Man” pair.)

Everything Must Go” was a feature story in the “Queens Chronicle” by Elizabeth Daley, editor (March 11, 2011).  Michael Halberian lived in the former Steinway Family Mansion.  It is uncertain whether the MacNeil sculpture was a Steinway heirloom that sold with the mansion or whether Mike discovered it in his appraisal work. (Some stories say he had is cast from the plaster original model.)

At that point I still had no idea where the statue was located.

Neither do you until next posting.

AND THAT IS THE BEST PART OF THE STORY. 

STAY TUNED!

Categories : Location, Sculptures, Statue
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Nearby or far away, there is no ONE place to go and appreciate this wide range of art pieces. Located in cities from east to west coast, found indoors and out, public and hidden, these creations point us toward the history and values in which our lives as Americans have taken root.

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